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Regained Control: A Phenomenological Study of the Use of a Relapse Prevention Plan by Patients With a Bipolar Disorder

Authors

  • Thea H. Daggenvoorde MSc, RN,

    Community Psychiatric Nurse, Student, Corresponding author
    1. Clinical Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands
    • Dimence Mental Health Care Centre, Almelo, The Netherlands
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  • Peter J. J. Goossens PhD, PMH-CNS, FEANS, RN,

    Professor, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Senior Researcher
    1. Mental Health at Saxion University of Applied Sciences, Deventer, The Netherlands
    2. Dimence Mental Health Care Centre, Deventer, The Netherlands
    3. Scientific Institute for Quality of Healthcare, Radboud University, Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
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  • Claudia J. Gamel PhD, RN

    Associate Professor, Lecturer
    1. Clinical Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands
    2. Division of Woman and Baby, Utrecht University Medical Center, Utrecht, The Netherlands
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  • Conflict of Interest Statement
  • The authors report no actual or potential conflicts of interest.

Author contact:

t.daggenvoorde@dimence.nl, with a copy to the Editor: gpearson@uchc.edu

Abstract

Purpose

To explore the lived experiences with the development and use of a relapse prevention plan by patients with a bipolar disorder.

Design and Methods

In this phenomenological study, we conducted unstructured interviews. Colaizzi's data analysis method was used.

Findings

The relapse prevention plan was perceived to provide a guide for patients to regain control over their lives and develop self-management skills. Contact with relatives and the match with the professional were critical facilitating factors.

Practice Implications

Professionals can draw upon the patient's experiential knowledge as an important source that guides clinical practice and decision-making.

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