Screening and Correlates of Depression and HbA1C in United Arab Emirates (UAE) Women With Diabetes

Authors

  • Sana Hawamdeh PhD,

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatric Mental Health, Chair, Corresponding author
    • Department of Nursing, College of Health Sciences, University of Sharjah, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
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  • Ibtihal Almakhzoomy RN, PhD,

    Assistant Professor
    1. College of Health Sciences, University of Sharjah, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
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  • Yaseen Hayajneh RN, PhD

    Assistant Professor
    1. College of Health Sciences, University of Sharjah, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
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  • Conflict of Interest Statement
  • The authors report no actual or potential conflicts of interest.

Author contact:

hawamdehs@gmail.com, with a copy to the Editor: gpearson@uchc.edu

Abstract

Purpose

The aim was to identify the relationship between socio-demographic characteristics of United Arab Emirates (UAE) women with diabetes and depression and to explore any differences between depressed and nondepressed patients in relation to glycemic control.

Design and Methods

One hundred eighty-two subjects completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II and a socio-demographic questionnaire (i.e., age, national status, economic status, level of education, and employment status). Glycemic control was assessed by glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C).

Findings

Ninety-two subjects were diagnosed with diabetes mellitus. A statistically significant higher incidence of depression was found in the subject group with diagnosed diabetes mellitus than in the nondiabetic subject group. A statistically significant relationship was found between depression status and type of diabetes (Type 1). A positive relationship between poor glycemic control and higher levels of depression was identified. A positively significant relationship was found between national status and level of depression among the diabetic sample, among whom at least half showed poor glycemic control (HbA1C levels > 7.5).

Practice Implications

Early detection of depression among women with diabetes is crucial to enhance treatment regimen adherence and glycemic control. As the UAE diabetic women are at even greater risk than other diabetic women, they need to be very carefully screened and evaluated for depression.

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