Evaluation of an Intensive Treatment Program for Disrupted Patient–Staff Relationships in Psychiatry

Authors

  • Nienke Kool RN, MSc,

    Researcher, Corresponding author
    1. Intensive Treatment Centre, Palier, The Hague, The Netherlands
    2. Department of Health, Sports & Welfare/Cluster Nursing, Research Group Mental Health Nursing, Inholland University of Applied Sciences, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
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  • Berno van Meijel RN, PhD,

    Associate Professor
    1. Department of Health, Sports & Welfare/Cluster Nursing, Research Group Mental Health Nursing, Inholland University of Applied Sciences, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    2. Parnassia Academy, Parnassia Psychiatric Institute, The Hague, The Netherlands
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  • Bauke Koekkoek RN, PhD,

    Associate Professor
    1. Research Group for Social Psychiatry & Mental Health Nursing, HAN University of Applied Sciences, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    2. ProCES, Pro Persona GGZ, Wolfheze, The Netherlands
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  • Ad Kerkhof PhD

    Professor
    1. Department of Clinical Psychology, and EMGO+, Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
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  • Conflict of Interest Statement

    The authors report no actual or potential conflicts of interests.

Abstract

Purpose

Some patients in psychiatric treatment are considered extremely difficult to treat because of the disruptive nature of their relationships with treatment staff. In this paper, we describe and evaluate a specialist inpatient treatment program for these patients.

Design and Methods

Data were collected from medical records and daily reports of patients (n = 108). Pretest–posttest measurements were used to evaluate the treatment.

Findings

The main treatment method consists of the provision of safety, structure, and cooperation. Treatment results show statistically significant changes from admittance to discharge.

Practice Implications

The collaborative and consistent manner in which nurses approach the patients is crucial for quality of care.

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