Do Tobacco Smoking and Illicit Drug/Alcohol Dependence Increase the Risk of Mental Disorders Among Men? Evidence from a National Urban Bangladeshi Sample

Authors

  • Mosiur Rahman MSc, MHSc,

    PhD candidate
    1. Department of International Health and Medicine, Division of Public Health, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Keiko Nakamura MD, PhD,

    Associate Professor
    1. Department of International Health and Medicine, Division of Public Health, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Kaoruko Seino PhD,

    Junior Associate Professor
    1. Department of International Health and Medicine, Division of Public Health, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Masashi Kizuki MD, MPH, PhD

    Junior Associate Professor
    1. Department of Health Promotion, Division of Public Health, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Conflict of Interest Statement

    The authors report no actual or potential conflict of interest.

Author contact:

swaponru_2000@yahoo.com, with a copy to the Editor: gpearson@uchc.edu

Abstract

Purpose

This study sought to examine the relationship between tobacco consumption or illicit drug/alcohol use and mental disorders.

Design and Methods

We used data from the 2006 Bangladesh Urban Health Survey. The analyses were based on the responses of 13,819 men aged 15–59 years.

Findings

Smoking of any type was associated with an increased risk of mental disorders as were current cigarette smoking, heavy cigarette, or bidi smoking status. Ever and current use of illicit drugs/alcohol was also associated with a greater risk of mental disorders among the participants.

Practice Implications

The present findings indicate that preventing tobacco smoking and illicit drug/alcohol dependence may help reduce the burden caused by mental disorders among urban Bangladeshi men. Reducing the risk of common mental health problems may also help reduce the prevalence of tobacco consumption and illicit drug/alcohol dependence.

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