Mismatch responses evoked by nociceptive stimuli

Authors

  • Li Hu,

    1. Key Laboratory of Cognition and Personality (Ministry of Education) and School of Psychology, Southwest University, Chongqing, China
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Chen Zhao,

    1. Key Laboratory of Cognition and Personality (Ministry of Education) and School of Psychology, Southwest University, Chongqing, China
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Hong Li,

    1. Research Center of Psychological Development and Education, Liaoning Normal University, Liaoning, China
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Elia Valentini

    Corresponding author
    1. Psychology Department, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy
    2. Santa Lucia Foundation, Scientific Institute for Research, Hospitalization and Health Care, Rome, Italy
    • Key Laboratory of Cognition and Personality (Ministry of Education) and School of Psychology, Southwest University, Chongqing, China
    Search for more papers by this author

  • Li Hu was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (31200856), Natural Science Foundation Project of CQ CSTC, and Special Financial Grant from the China Postdoctoral Science Special Foundation (2012T50755). Hong Li was supported by the R&D Special Fund for Health Profession (201002003) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (81171289).

Address correspondence to: Elia Valentini, PhD, Department of Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Via dei Marsi 78-00185, Roma, Italy. E-mail: elia.valentini@uniroma1.it or to Hong Li, Research Center of Psychological Development and Education, Liaoning Normal University, Dalian, Liaoning Province, 116029, China. E-mail: lihong@lnnu.edu.cn

Abstract

We studied whether nociceptive mismatch negativity (nMMN) could be obtained as result of nociceptive fibers stimulation. The purported nMMN revealed a topography similar to the somatosensory MMN (sMMN), which was observed at the bilateral temporal regions of the scalp. Importantly, only early negativities (100–250 ms) located at these regions revealed a selective modulation associated to the processing of deviancy regardless of the attentional focus. The amplitude modulation of the sMMN had an earlier onset than the nMMN (110 ms vs. 182 ms) as well as a larger difference of latency between the contralateral and the ipsilateral onset of the activity (52 ms vs. 4 ms). Altogether, these observations provide evidence that (a) a nMMN can be elicited by nociceptive stimuli, and (b) the nMMN is topographically similar to the sMMN while differing in latency and possibly in functional organization of their generators.

Ancillary