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Sound-induced perturbations of the brain network in non-REM sleep, and network oscillations in wake

Authors

  • Weiwei Wu,

    Corresponding author
    • Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas, USA
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  • Bhavin R. Sheth

    1. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas, USA
    2. Center for NeuroEngineering and Cognitive Systems, University of Houston, Houston, Texas, USA
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  • We thank Shuang Liu for data collection and removal of artifacts. We owe a special debt of gratitude to Peri Ktonas and Ben Jansen for generous guidance in the analysis.

Address correspondence to: Bhavin R. Sheth, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-4005. E-mail: brsheth@uh.edu

Abstract

During sleep, the brain network processes sensory stimuli without awareness. Stimulation must affect differently brain networks in sleep versus wake, but these differences have yet to be quantified. We recorded cortical activity in stage 2 (SII) sleep and wake using EEG while a tone was intermittently played. Zero-lag correlation measured input to pairs of sensors in the network; cross-correlation and phase-lag index measured pairwise corticocortical connectivity. Our analysis revealed that under baseline conditions, the cortical network, in particular the central regions of the frontoparietal cortex, interact at a characteristic latency of 50 ms, but only during wake, not sleep. Nonsalient auditory stimulation causes far greater perturbation of connectivity from baseline in sleep than wake, both in the response to common input and corticocortical connectivity. The findings have key implications for sensory processing.

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