Hemodynamic, hemostatic, and endothelial reactions to acute psychological stress in depressed patients following coronary angiography

Authors

  • Annik Plourde,

    1. Montreal Behavioural Medicine Centre, Hôpital du Sacré-Cœur de Montréal—a University of Montreal affiliated hospital, Montréal, Québec, Canada
    2. Research Centre, Hôpital du Sacré-Cœur de Montréal—a University of Montreal affiliated hospital, Montréal, Québec, Canada
    3. Department of Psychology, University of Quebec at Montreal (UQAM), Montreal, Quebec, Canada
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  • Kim L. Lavoie,

    1. Montreal Behavioural Medicine Centre, Hôpital du Sacré-Cœur de Montréal—a University of Montreal affiliated hospital, Montréal, Québec, Canada
    2. Research Centre, Hôpital du Sacré-Cœur de Montréal—a University of Montreal affiliated hospital, Montréal, Québec, Canada
    3. Department of Psychology, University of Quebec at Montreal (UQAM), Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    4. Research Centre, Montreal Heart Institute—a University of Montreal affiliated hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
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  • Karine Ouellet,

    1. Montreal Behavioural Medicine Centre, Hôpital du Sacré-Cœur de Montréal—a University of Montreal affiliated hospital, Montréal, Québec, Canada
    2. Research Centre, Hôpital du Sacré-Cœur de Montréal—a University of Montreal affiliated hospital, Montréal, Québec, Canada
    3. Department of Psychology, University of Quebec at Montreal (UQAM), Montreal, Quebec, Canada
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  • Douglas Carroll,

    1. School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, England, UK
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  • Christopher Ring,

    1. School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, England, UK
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  • Simon L. Bacon

    Corresponding author
    1. Research Centre, Hôpital du Sacré-Cœur de Montréal—a University of Montreal affiliated hospital, Montréal, Québec, Canada
    2. Department of Psychology, University of Quebec at Montreal (UQAM), Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    3. Research Centre, Montreal Heart Institute—a University of Montreal affiliated hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    4. Department of Exercise Science, Concordia University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    • Montreal Behavioural Medicine Centre, Hôpital du Sacré-Cœur de Montréal—a University of Montreal affiliated hospital, Montréal, Québec, Canada
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  • Funding support for this study was provided by salary awards from the Fonds de recherche du Québec—Santé (FRQS) (KLL and SLB) and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) (SLB), grant support from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Counsel of Canada (KLL), and scholarship support from the CIHR and the FRQS (AP and KO). The data were originally collected by the Cardiovascular Psychophysiology Unit, City Hospital NHS Trust, Birmingham, UK.

Address correspondence to: Simon L. Bacon, PhD, Montreal Behavioural Medicine Centre, Hôpital du Sacré-Cœur de Montréal, 5400 Gouin West, Montréal, Québec, H4J 1C5, Canada; E-mail: simon.bacon@concordia.ca

Abstract

Although there is evidence that depression is associated with an increased risk for coronary artery disease (CAD), the mechanisms underlying this association remain unclear. This study examined the association between depression and hemodynamic, hemostatic, and endothelial responses to psychological stress. Seventy-two postcoronary angiography patients completed a mental stress task. Blood pressure, heart rate, and impedance cardiography were recorded at rest and during the task. Blood samples were taken at the end of rest and immediately after the task. Depression was evaluated using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule Self-Administered (DISSA). In total, 21% of the participants were depressed. Analyses revealed that depression was associated with blunted pre-ejection period stress reactivity and with increased platelet factor 4 reactivity. These data provide potential mechanistic pathways linking depression to increased CAD.

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