Associations among work-related stress, cortisol, inflammation, and metabolic syndrome

Authors

  • Tawfiq Almadi,

    Corresponding author
    1. Discipline of Exercise and Sport Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, Australia
    • Address correspondence to: Tawfiq Almadi, Discipline of Exercise and Sport Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney, P.O. Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825, Australia. E-mail: talm3809@uni.sydney.edu.au

    Search for more papers by this author
  • Ian Cathers,

    1. Discipline of Exercise and Sport Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Chin Moi Chow

    1. Discipline of Exercise and Sport Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author

  • The authors gratefully thank Dr. Mark Halaki for his advice on statistical analyses, the authors of ERI, PSS, and PSQI for permission to translate, validate, and use their questionnaires, and Sukina Medical Laboratory for providing laboratory facilities to conduct biochemical testing.

Abstract

This cross-sectional study examined the relationship between work-related stress, cortisol, and C-reactive protein (CRP) in predicting metabolic syndrome (MtS). Self-reported work stress measured by the effort reward imbalance ratio (ERI), anthropometric data, CRP, and saliva cortisol were collected from 204 healthy Jordanian male workers. ERI and cortisol were significantly associated with the presence of MtS (OR = 4.74, 95% CI: 2.13–10.55; OR = 3.03, 95% CI: 2.08–4.40; OR = 11.50, 95% CI: 2.16–59.14, respectively). The odds of MtS in men with high ERI and high cortisol were significantly higher than that of men with low ERI and low cortisol (OR = 11.50, 95% CI: 2.16–59.14). CRP was significantly associated with MtS (OR = 2.51, 95% CI: 1.50–4.20). The odds of MtS were significantly higher in centrally obese men with both high ERI and CRP level. Thus, high ERI along with high cortisol or high CRP increases the risk for MtS, especially among centrally obese men.

Ancillary