Adult attachment style and cortisol responses across the day in older adults

Authors

  • Tara Kidd,

    Corresponding author
    1. Psychobiology Unit, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, England
    • Address correspondence to: Tara Kidd, PhD, Psychobiology Unit, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, 1-19 Torrington Place, London, England WC1E 6BT. E-mail: T.Kidd@ucl.ac.uk

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  • Mark Hamer,

    1. Psychobiology Unit, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, England
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  • Andrew Steptoe

    1. Psychobiology Unit, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, England
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  • This research was supported by the British Heart Foundation. We wish to thank the participating civil service departments and their welfare, personnel, and establishment officers—the Occupational Health and Safety Agency, the Council of Civil Service Unions—all participants in the Whitehall II study, and all members of the Whitehall II study team.

Abstract

The association between cortisol and adult attachment style, an important indicator of social relationships, has been relatively unexplored. Previous research has examined adult attachment and acute cortisol responses to stress in the laboratory, but less is known about cortisol levels in everyday life. The present study examined adult romantic attachment style and cortisol responses across the day. Salivary cortisol was collected at six time points during the course of the day in 1,807 healthy men and women from a subsample of the Whitehall II cohort. Significant associations were found between attachment on cortisol across the day and slope of cortisol decline. The lowest cortisol output was associated with fearful attachment, with preoccupied attachment having the highest levels and a flatter cortisol profile. The results tentatively support the proposition that attachment style may contribute to HPA dysregulation.

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