Get access

Virtually simulated social pressure influences early visual processing more in low compared to high autonomous participants

Authors

  • Sina Alexa Trautmann-Lengsfeld,

    1. Institute of Psychology, Department of Experimental Psychology, Carl von Ossietzky University Oldenburg, Oldenburg, Germany
    2. Department of Neurophysiology and Pathophysiology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Christoph Siegfried Herrmann

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute of Psychology, Department of Experimental Psychology, Carl von Ossietzky University Oldenburg, Oldenburg, Germany
    2. Research Center Neurosensory Science, Carl von Ossietzky University Oldenburg, Oldenburg, Germany
    • Address correspondence to: Prof. Dr. Christoph S. Herrmann, Experimental Psychology Laboratory, Institute of Psychology, Faculty V, Carl von Ossietzky University Oldenburg, 26111 Oldenburg, Germany. E-mail: christoph.herrmann@uni-oldenburg.de

    Search for more papers by this author

  • This study was supported by the Volkswagen Foundation. We would like to thank Eva Walther for helpful discussions during the design development, Toralf Neuling for help with stimulus creation, Christina Lavallee for helpful comments during proofreading, Kathrin Bock, Andrea Finke, and Marie Meemken for support during data collection, and all participants for their participation.

Abstract

In a previous study, we showed that virtually simulated social group pressure could influence early stages of perception after only 100 ms. In the present EEG study, we investigated the influence of social pressure on visual perception in participants with high (HA) and low (LA) levels of autonomy. Ten HA and ten LA individuals were asked to accomplish a visual discrimination task in an adapted paradigm of Solomon Asch. Results indicate that LA participants adapted to the incorrect group opinion more often than HA participants (42% vs. 30% of the trials, respectively). LA participants showed a larger posterior P1 component contralateral to targets presented in the right visual field when conforming to the correct compared to conforming to the incorrect group decision. In conclusion, our ERP data suggest that the group context can have early effects on our perception rather than on conscious decision processes in LA, but not HA participants.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary