What's intact and what's not within the mismatch negativity system in schizophrenia

Authors

  • Juanita Todd,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Psychology, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, Australia
    2. Priority Research Centre, Translational Neuroscience and Mental Health Research, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, Australia
    3. Schizophrenia Research Institute, Darlinghurst, Australia
    • Address correspondence to: Juanita Todd, School of Psychology, University of Newcastle, University Drive, Callaghan, NSW, Australia, 2308. E-mail: Juanita.Todd@newcastle.edu.au

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  • Lisa Whitson,

    1. School of Psychology, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, Australia
    2. Priority Research Centre, Translational Neuroscience and Mental Health Research, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, Australia
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  • Ellen Smith,

    1. School of Psychology, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, Australia
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  • Patricia T. Michie,

    1. School of Psychology, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, Australia
    2. Priority Research Centre, Translational Neuroscience and Mental Health Research, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, Australia
    3. Schizophrenia Research Institute, Darlinghurst, Australia
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  • Ulrich Schall,

    1. Priority Research Centre, Translational Neuroscience and Mental Health Research, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, Australia
    2. Schizophrenia Research Institute, Darlinghurst, Australia
    3. School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, Australia
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  • Philip B. Ward

    1. School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Callaghan, Australia
    2. Schizophrenia Research Unit, South Western Sydney Local Health District, Liverpool, Australia
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  • This research was funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC: Project Grant ID 1002995) and was supported by the Australian Schizophrenia Research Bank (ASRB) and the Schizophrenia Research Institute utilizing infrastructure funding from NSW Health. We gratefully acknowledge the assistance of Dr. David McKenzie in data collection and preprocessing.

Abstract

Repetitive patterning facilitates inferences about likely properties of sound to follow. Mismatch negativity (MMN) occurs when sound fails to match an inference. Smaller MMN in schizophrenia indexes deficient gain control (difference in utilizing a limited dynamic range). Although it is clear that this group has a lower limit to MMN size, this study addressed whether smaller MMN indicates impaired perceptual inference. MMN was elicited to four deviants in two sequences: one in which occurrence was random and one in which it was paired. Despite smaller MMN, persons with schizophrenia are equally able to reduce MMN size evoked by a deviant when its occurrence is cued. Results also expose alterations in the evoked response to repeated sounds that appear to be exacerbations of age-related amplitude decline. Since these anomalies impact the computed MMN, they highlight the need to identify all contributions to limits in gain control in schizophrenia.

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