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Modafinil augments oscillatory power in middle frequencies during rule selection

Authors

  • Michael J. Minzenberg,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, California, USA
    2. San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, California, USA
    • Address correspondence to: Michael J. Minzenberg, MD, Outpatient Mental Health Service, 116C San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 4150 Clement Street, San Francisco, CA 94121, USA. E-mail: Michael.minzenberg@ucsf.edu

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  • Glenn C. Gomes,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California, USA
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  • Jong H. Yoon,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California, USA
    2. Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Palo Alto, California, USA
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  • Andrew J. Watrous,

    1. Center for Neuroscience, University of California, Davis, Davis, California, USA
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  • Joy Geng,

    1. Center for Neuroscience, University of California, Davis, Davis, California, USA
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  • Alana J. Firl,

    1. Program in Vision Neuroscience, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California, USA
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  • Cameron S. Carter

    1. Department of Psychiatry, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California, USA
    2. Center for Neuroscience, University of California, Davis, Davis, California, USA
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  • This work was supported by a Clinical Scientist Development Award from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and a Young Investigator award from NARSAD (Brain and Behavior Foundation) to MJM. This publication was also made possible by Grant Number UL1 RR024146 from the National Center for Research Resources (NCRR), a component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and NIH Roadmap for Medical Research. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official view of NCRR or NIH. The authors would like to acknowledge the assistance of Janeth Nunez del Prado, Jenny Yen, and Dennis Thompson in the conduct and analysis of the study.

Abstract

Control-related cognitive processes are associated with cortical oscillations and modulated by catecholamine neurotransmitters. It remains unclear how catecholamine systems modulate control-related oscillations. We tested modafinil effects on rule-related 4–30 Hz oscillations, with double-blind, placebo-controlled (within-subjects) testing of 22 healthy adults, using EEG during cognitive control task performance. EEG data underwent time-frequency decomposition with Morlet wavelets to determine power of 4–30 Hz oscillations. Modafinil enhanced oscillatory power associated with high-control rule selection in theta, alpha, and beta ranges, with a frontotemporal topography and minimal effects during rule maintenance. Augmentation of catecholamine signaling enhances middle-frequency cortical oscillatory power associated with rule selection, which may subserve diverse subcomponent processes in proactive cognitive control.

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