Interorganizational Mobility within the U.S. Federal Government: Examining the Effect of Individual and Organizational Factors

Authors


  • Jan Wynen is junior researcher in the Public Management Institute at the University of Leuven, Belgium. He is currently working on a doctoral project examining the effect of autonomy in the public sector. He holds a master's degree in commercial sciences and an advanced master's degree in international business economics. His main research interests are econometrics and public management. E-mail: jan.wynen@soc.kuleuven.be

  • Sophie Op de Beeck is junior researcher in the Public Management Institute at the University of Leuven, Belgium. Her research interests are in the area of personnel management in the public sector, specifi cally, competency management, strategic human resource management, and the role of line managers in personnel matters. She is currently working on a doctoral project studying the distribution of human resource management responsibilities in the public sector and the role of line managers in effective human resource management implementation. E-mail: sophie.opdebeeck@soc.kuleuven.be

  • Annie Hondeghem is professor of public administration and director of the Public Management Institute at the University of Leuven, Belgium. Her research deals with public personnel management, change management, and equal opportunity policies. She is a member of the editorial board of Public Administration Review and the editor (with James L. Perry) of Motivation in Public Management: The Call of Public Service (Oxford University Press, 2008). She is co-convenor of the IIAS Study Group on Administrative Leadership. E-mail: annie.hondeghem@soc.kuleuven.be

Abstract

Interorganizational mobility can make a positive contribution both organizationally and government-wide. Using data from the U.S. Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey, this article seeks to provide a better empirical understanding of the determinants of interorganizational mobility within the U.S. federal government. A specific analytical framework is used, as the intention to take another job within the federal government is nested in the intention to leave the current organization. The results highlight that gender, minority status, length of service, and promotion are determinants of interorganizational mobility within the U.S. federal government.

Ancillary