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Embryo transfer (ET) and artificial insemination (AI) are potentially invaluable techniques for the propagation and management of genetically valuable domestic cat and endangered nondomestic cat populations. Many of the challenges that impair the effective application of ET and AI in felids may be overcome by using laparoscopic oviductal (LO) approaches. LO-ET and LO-AI are minimally-invasive procedures, requiring only two small skin incisions for insertion of a laparoscope and grasping forceps into the abdominal cavity to permit visualization and catheterization of the oviduct for embryo or semen deposition. With concurrent improvements in embryo culture systems and ovarian synchronization protocols, LO-ET has proven effective over the past decade for propagation of laboratory cats, cat models of hereditary disease and nondomestic cats. To date, viable offspring have been produced following LO-ET of non-frozen and frozen-thawed IVF-derived embryos in eight cat hereditary disease models and two nondomestic cat species, the ocelot and sand cat. LO-AI with low sperm numbers (c. 2–8 million motile) has shown similar efficacy to LO-ET, resulting in high pregnancy percentages (50–70%) following insemination of gonadotropin-treated domestic cats. Multiple kittens also have been produced in two hereditary disease models following LO-AI with frozen semen, and both ocelot and Pallas' cat kittens have been born after LO-AI with freshly-collected semen. The application of LO-ET and LO-AI to felids has resulted in substantial improvement in the efficiency of assisted reproduction for genetic management of these invaluable domestic cat and wild cat populations.