Successful Treatment for Subinvolution of Placental Sites in the Bitch with Low Oral Doses of Progestagen

Authors

  • MJ Voorhorst,

    1. Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands
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  • JC van Brederode,

    1. Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands
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  • CHJ Albers-Wolthers,

    1. Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands
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  • J de Gier,

    1. Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands
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  • AC Schaefers-Okkens

    Corresponding author
    • Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands
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Author's address (for correspondence): AC Schaefers-Okkens, Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 108, PO Box 80154, NL-3508 TD Utrecht, The Netherlands. E-mail: a.c.schaefers@uu.nl

Contents

Subinvolution of placental sites (SIPS) is the major cause of persistent sanguineous vaginal discharge after parturition in the bitch. Spontaneous remission is common but may take several months, and hence, medical therapy to end the discharge is often requested. In this retrospective study, we evaluated the effect of treatment for SIPS with low oral doses of a progestagen. Nine bitches with SIPS, but otherwise clinically healthy, were found in the computer database of the Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals. Seven of these bitches were treated with low oral doses of a progestagen (megestrol acetate, 0.1 mg/kg body weight (bw) once daily for the 1st week, then 0.05 mg/kg bw once daily for the 2nd week). The other two bitches were untreated. Treatment results were evaluated by a telephone questionnaire. Progestagen treatment was successful in all of the treated dogs; sanguineous vaginal discharge stopped within the treatment period. One of the two untreated dogs remained symptomatic until the next oestrus, approximately 120 days after parturition, and the other remained symptomatic until 6 weeks before the start of the next pro-oestrus, 270 days after parturition. No side effects of the progestagen treatment were observed. Subsequent gestations, parturitions and puerperal periods of 5 mated bitches were uneventful. One bitch did not become pregnant after mating. In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that oral administration of low doses of progestagen for 2 weeks is effective in stopping persistent sanguineous vaginal discharge in bitches with SIPS, with neither side effects nor reduced subsequent fertility.

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