Respirology

Cover image for Vol. 15 Issue 6

August 2010

Volume 15, Issue 6

Pages 873–1015

  1. EDITORIAL

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL
    3. THINK TANK REVIEW
    4. PRO/CON DEBATE
    5. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: HOW TO SET UP PULMONARY SUBSPECIALTY SERVICES
    6. REVIEWS
    7. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    8. CASE REPORTS
    9. FORTHCOMING MEETINGS
    10. JOURNAL STATISTICS
    1. You have free access to this content
  2. THINK TANK REVIEW

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL
    3. THINK TANK REVIEW
    4. PRO/CON DEBATE
    5. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: HOW TO SET UP PULMONARY SUBSPECIALTY SERVICES
    6. REVIEWS
    7. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    8. CASE REPORTS
    9. FORTHCOMING MEETINGS
    10. JOURNAL STATISTICS
    1. You have free access to this content
      Have advanced research technologies made real impact on respiratory medicine? (pages 876–880)

      Kjetil ASK, Oliver EICKELBERG, Jack GAULDIE, Naftali KAMINSKI and Martin KOLB

      Version of Record online: 20 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2010.01811.x

  3. PRO/CON DEBATE

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL
    3. THINK TANK REVIEW
    4. PRO/CON DEBATE
    5. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: HOW TO SET UP PULMONARY SUBSPECIALTY SERVICES
    6. REVIEWS
    7. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    8. CASE REPORTS
    9. FORTHCOMING MEETINGS
    10. JOURNAL STATISTICS
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      The safety of long-acting beta-agonists: More evidence is needed (pages 881–886)

      Shamsah KAZANI, James H. WARE, Jeffrey M. DRAZEN, D. Robin TAYLOR and Malcolm R. SEARS

      Version of Record online: 6 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2010.01800.x

  4. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: HOW TO SET UP PULMONARY SUBSPECIALTY SERVICES

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL
    3. THINK TANK REVIEW
    4. PRO/CON DEBATE
    5. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: HOW TO SET UP PULMONARY SUBSPECIALTY SERVICES
    6. REVIEWS
    7. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    8. CASE REPORTS
    9. FORTHCOMING MEETINGS
    10. JOURNAL STATISTICS
    1. You have free access to this content
  5. REVIEWS

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL
    3. THINK TANK REVIEW
    4. PRO/CON DEBATE
    5. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: HOW TO SET UP PULMONARY SUBSPECIALTY SERVICES
    6. REVIEWS
    7. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    8. CASE REPORTS
    9. FORTHCOMING MEETINGS
    10. JOURNAL STATISTICS
    1. You have free access to this content
      Heart failure and COPD: Partners in crime? (pages 895–901)

      Jorien D.C. HANNINK, Hanneke A.C. Van HELVOORT, P.N. Richard DEKHUIJZEN and Yvonne F. HEIJDRA

      Version of Record online: 4 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2010.01776.x

    2. You have free access to this content
  6. ORIGINAL ARTICLES

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL
    3. THINK TANK REVIEW
    4. PRO/CON DEBATE
    5. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: HOW TO SET UP PULMONARY SUBSPECIALTY SERVICES
    6. REVIEWS
    7. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    8. CASE REPORTS
    9. FORTHCOMING MEETINGS
    10. JOURNAL STATISTICS
    1. A detailed evaluation of acute respiratory decline in patients with fibrotic lung disease: Aetiology and outcomes (pages 909–917)

      Tristan J. HUIE, Amy L. OLSON, Gregory P. COSGROVE, William J. JANSSEN, Abigail R. LARA, David A. LYNCH, Steve D. GROSHONG, Marc MOSS, Marvin I. SCHWARZ, Kevin K. BROWN and Stephen K. FRANKEL

      Version of Record online: 4 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2010.01774.x

      A detailed evaluation of acute respiratory decline in patients with fibrotic lung disease revealed a potential infectious cause in a minority of cases. Identification of a potential explanation for the decline did not influence outcomes in these patients.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Effect of comorbid diabetes on length of stay and risk of death in patients admitted with acute exacerbations of COPD (pages 918–922)

      Ali PARAPPIL, Barbara DEPCZYNSKI, Peter COLLETT and Guy B. MARKS

      Version of Record online: 4 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2010.01781.x

      We examined the effect of comorbid diabetes on outcomes in patients hospitalized with acute exacerbations of COPD. There was a trend towards increased length of stay and deaths in those with comorbid diabetes. Further studies are required to elucidate the reasons for poorer outcomes.

    3. Clinical profile of adult cystic fibrosis patients with frequent epidemic clones of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (pages 923–929)

      Pholawat TINGPEJ, Mark ELKINS, Barbara ROSE, Honghua HU, Carmel MORIARTY, Jim MANOS, Belinda BARRAS, Peter BYE and Colin HARBOUR

      Version of Record online: 21 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2010.01792.x

      This clinical study provides evidence of the increased virulence of three of four Pseudomonas aeruginosa frequent epidemic clones infecting approximately half the adult population in an eastern Australian cystic fibrosis centre.

    4. Reticular basement membrane fragmentation and potential epithelial mesenchymal transition is exaggerated in the airways of smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (pages 930–938)

      Sukhwinder S. SOHAL, David REID, Amir SOLTANI, Chris WARD, Steven WESTON, H. Konrad MULLER, Richard WOOD-BAKER and Eugene H. WALTERS

      Version of Record online: 12 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2010.01808.x

      In smokers and COPD patients, the reticular basement membrane is highly fragmented, with clefts containing cells staining for the proteolytic enzyme, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and the fibroblast protein, S100A4. There is double staining for S100A4 and the mesenchymal marker, vimentin. These are likely hallmarks of active epithelial mesenchymal transition.

    5. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator system and human cationic antimicrobial protein 18 in serum and induced sputum of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (pages 939–946)

      Yuanyuan JIANG, Wei XIAO, Yi ZHANG and Ying XING

      Version of Record online: 6 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2010.01799.x

      Concentrations of the innate immune biomarkers uPAR, PAI-1 and CAP18 were significantly higher in sputum of COPD patients compared with control subjects, and were associated with FEV1%, SGRQ scores and 6MWD, suggesting they may be biomarkers of disease activity and progression, and potential therapeutic targets in COPD.

    6. Recent consumption of a large meal does not affect measurements of lung function (pages 947–951)

      Elise CHU, Debbie BURTON, Nigel MCARDLE and Kevin GAIN

      Version of Record online: 6 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2010.01796.x

      The study aim was to determine the effect of a large meal consumed prior to lung function measurement. No effect of meal on FEV1, FVC, TLC or DLCO was seen. This result does not support the recommendation that patients need to abstain from large meals prior to lung function testing.

    7. Diagnostic accuracy of a questionnaire and simple home monitoring device in detecting obstructive sleep apnoea in a Chinese population at high cardiovascular risk (pages 952–960)

      Dashiell GANTNER, Ji-Yong GE, Li-Hua LI, Nick ANTIC, Sam WINDLER, Keith WONG, Emma HEELEY, Shao-Guang HUANG, Ping CUI, Craig ANDERSON, Ji-Guang WANG and Doug MCEVOY

      Version of Record online: 6 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2010.01797.x

      This study in a high cardiovascular risk Chinese population is the first to directly compare home oximetry and nasal flow recordings (ApneaLink) with polysomnography for the diagnosis of moderate-severe OSA. It showed a high level of diagnostic accuracy for both signals but oximetry was the more technically reliable.

    8. Early onset pneumonia in patients with cholinesterase inhibitor poisoning (pages 961–968)

      Chen-Yu WANG, Chieh-Liang WU, Yu-Tse TSAN, Jeng-Yuan HSU, Dong-Zong HUNG and Chih-Hung WANG

      Version of Record online: 21 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2010.01806.x

      The relationship between pneumonia and cholinesterase inhibitor poisoning is rarely discussed in the literature. This is the first study reporting risk factors for early onset pneumonia in patients with cholinesterase inhibitor poisoning.

    9. Significance of the progression of respiratory symptoms for predicting community-acquired pneumonia in general practice (pages 969–974)

      Masanori NAKANISHI, Yoshimasa YOSHIDA, Nobuya TAKEDA, Hirohumi HIRANA, Takahiro HORITA, Kazuhiko SHIMIZU, Kazuyuki HIRATANI, Shigeo TOYODA, Takayuki MATSUMURA, Eizi SHINNO, Satoru KAWAI, Akihiro FUTAMURA, Masanari OTA and Toshiki NATAZUKA

      Version of Record online: 12 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2010.01807.x

      There are no precise and validated criteria for predicting community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). In primary care patients with suspected CAP are typically identified by symptoms and signs. This study showed that progression of symptoms was a significant factor for predicting the incidence of CAP.

    10. Spirometry and impulse oscillometry (IOS) for detection of respiratory abnormalities in metropolitan firefighters (pages 975–985)

      Tjard SCHERMER, Winifred MALBON, Wendy NEWBURY, Christine HOLTON, Michael SMITH, Michael MORGAN and Alan CROCKETT

      Version of Record online: 12 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2010.01809.x

      Firefighters are at increased risk of adverse health effects, thus periodic examination of their respiratory health is important. The use of impulse oscillometry for the assessment of respiratory health of firefighters identified airways dysfunction in some, even when respiratory symptoms were absent and spirometry values were within the normal range.

    11. Sustained effects of thoracocentesis on oxygenation in mechanically ventilated patients (pages 986–992)

      Andrew P. WALDEN, Christopher S. GARRARD and Jonathon SALMON

      Version of Record online: 20 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2010.01810.x

      For patients requiring mechanical ventilation for greater than 72 h, the drainage of large volume pleural effusions led to a 40% improvement in the PaO2 and a 34% improvement in the PaO2/FiO2 (P:F) ratio within 30 min. The effects on the P:F ratio were maintained for 48 h after the procedure. Similar improvements were seen in A-a gradient, dead space fraction, ventilatory support and dynamic compliance. These improvements suggest that drainage of large effusions facilitate weaning from mechanical ventilation.

    12. Indoor exposure to environmental cigarette smoke, but not other inhaled particulates associates with respiratory symptoms and diminished lung function in adults (pages 993–1000)

      Lars-Georg HERSOUG, Lise L.N. HUSEMOEN, Torben SIGSGAARD, Flemming MADSEN and Allan LINNEBERG

      Version of Record online: 23 APR 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2010.01758.x

      Self-reported exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, but not self-reported exposure to wood stoves, candles or gas cookers, was significantly associated with an increased prevalence of lower respiratory tract symptoms and decreased lung function.

    13. Pleural space elastance and changes in oxygenation after therapeutic thoracentesis in ventilated patients with heart failure and transudative pleural effusions (pages 1001–1008)

      Wei-Lin CHEN, Chi-Li CHUNG, Shih-Hsin HSIAO and Shi-Chuan CHANG

      Version of Record online: 20 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2010.01812.x

      Pleural pressure and pleural space elastance during therapeutic thoracentesis and the resulting changes in oxygenation were measured in mechanically ventilated patients with heart failure and transudative pleural effusions. Patients with smaller changes in pleural pressure and lower pleural space elastance showed greater improvement in oxygenation after therapeutic thoracentesis.

  7. CASE REPORTS

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL
    3. THINK TANK REVIEW
    4. PRO/CON DEBATE
    5. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: HOW TO SET UP PULMONARY SUBSPECIALTY SERVICES
    6. REVIEWS
    7. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    8. CASE REPORTS
    9. FORTHCOMING MEETINGS
    10. JOURNAL STATISTICS
    1. Early bronchiectasis in cystic fibrosis detected by surveillance CT (pages 1009–1011)

      Naveen PILLARISETTI, Barry LINNANE and Sarath RANGANATHAN

      Version of Record online: 23 APR 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2010.01765.x

    2. An unusual presentation of Castleman's disease (pages 1012–1014)

      Volkan BAYSUNGUR, Cagatay TEZEL, Erdal OKUR, Gokhan ERGENE, Kursat OZVARAN and Semih HALEZEROGLU

      Version of Record online: 12 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2010.01805.x

  8. FORTHCOMING MEETINGS

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL
    3. THINK TANK REVIEW
    4. PRO/CON DEBATE
    5. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: HOW TO SET UP PULMONARY SUBSPECIALTY SERVICES
    6. REVIEWS
    7. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    8. CASE REPORTS
    9. FORTHCOMING MEETINGS
    10. JOURNAL STATISTICS
    1. FORTHCOMING MEETINGS (page 1015)

      Version of Record online: 21 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2010.01823_1.x

  9. JOURNAL STATISTICS

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIAL
    3. THINK TANK REVIEW
    4. PRO/CON DEBATE
    5. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: HOW TO SET UP PULMONARY SUBSPECIALTY SERVICES
    6. REVIEWS
    7. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    8. CASE REPORTS
    9. FORTHCOMING MEETINGS
    10. JOURNAL STATISTICS
    1. JOURNAL STATISTICS (page 1015)

      Version of Record online: 21 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2010.01823_2.x

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