Respirology

Cover image for Vol. 16 Issue 6

August 2011

Volume 16, Issue 6

Pages 871–1016

  1. EDITORIALS

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIALS
    3. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: RESPIRATORY HEALTH ISSUES IN THE ASIA-PACIFIC REGION
    4. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGIES
    5. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: PLEURAL DISEASE
    6. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: HOW TO SET UP PULMONARY SUBSPECIALTY SERVICES
    7. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    8. CLINICAL NOTE
    9. FORTHCOMING MEETINGS
    10. JOURNAL STATISTICS
    1. You have free access to this content
    2. You have free access to this content
      Changing epidemiology of respiratory pathogens and the role of improved diagnostics (pages 873–875)

      Tom Kotsimbos and Allen C. Cheng

      Version of Record online: 25 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2011.02004.x

  2. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: RESPIRATORY HEALTH ISSUES IN THE ASIA-PACIFIC REGION

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIALS
    3. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: RESPIRATORY HEALTH ISSUES IN THE ASIA-PACIFIC REGION
    4. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGIES
    5. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: PLEURAL DISEASE
    6. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: HOW TO SET UP PULMONARY SUBSPECIALTY SERVICES
    7. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    8. CLINICAL NOTE
    9. FORTHCOMING MEETINGS
    10. JOURNAL STATISTICS
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      Pandemic response lessons from influenza H1N1 2009 in Asia (pages 876–882)

      DALE FISHER, DAVID S. HUI, ZHANCHENG GAO, CHRISTOPHER LEE, MYOUNG-DON OH, BIN CAO, TRAN TINH HIEN, KRISTA PATLOVICH and JEREMY FARRAR

      Version of Record online: 25 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2011.02003.x

  3. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGIES

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIALS
    3. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: RESPIRATORY HEALTH ISSUES IN THE ASIA-PACIFIC REGION
    4. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGIES
    5. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: PLEURAL DISEASE
    6. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: HOW TO SET UP PULMONARY SUBSPECIALTY SERVICES
    7. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    8. CLINICAL NOTE
    9. FORTHCOMING MEETINGS
    10. JOURNAL STATISTICS
    1. You have free access to this content
  4. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: PLEURAL DISEASE

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIALS
    3. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: RESPIRATORY HEALTH ISSUES IN THE ASIA-PACIFIC REGION
    4. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGIES
    5. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: PLEURAL DISEASE
    6. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: HOW TO SET UP PULMONARY SUBSPECIALTY SERVICES
    7. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    8. CLINICAL NOTE
    9. FORTHCOMING MEETINGS
    10. JOURNAL STATISTICS
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      Intrapleural therapy (pages 891–899)

      J. TERRILL HUGGINS, PETER DOELKEN and STEVEN A. SAHN

      Version of Record online: 25 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2011.02011.x

  5. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: HOW TO SET UP PULMONARY SUBSPECIALTY SERVICES

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIALS
    3. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: RESPIRATORY HEALTH ISSUES IN THE ASIA-PACIFIC REGION
    4. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGIES
    5. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: PLEURAL DISEASE
    6. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: HOW TO SET UP PULMONARY SUBSPECIALTY SERVICES
    7. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    8. CLINICAL NOTE
    9. FORTHCOMING MEETINGS
    10. JOURNAL STATISTICS
    1. You have free access to this content
      How to set up a severe asthma service (pages 900–911)

      VANESSA M. MCDONALD, ANNE E. VERTIGAN and PETER G. GIBSON

      Version of Record online: 25 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2011.02012.x

  6. ORIGINAL ARTICLES

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIALS
    3. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: RESPIRATORY HEALTH ISSUES IN THE ASIA-PACIFIC REGION
    4. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGIES
    5. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: PLEURAL DISEASE
    6. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: HOW TO SET UP PULMONARY SUBSPECIALTY SERVICES
    7. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    8. CLINICAL NOTE
    9. FORTHCOMING MEETINGS
    10. JOURNAL STATISTICS
    1. The all-age spirometry reference ranges reflect contemporary Australasian spirometry (pages 912–917)

      BRUCE R. THOMPSON, SANJA STANOJEVIC, MICHAEL J. ABRAMSON, RICHARD BEASLEY, ANDREW COATES, ANNETTE DENT, BRENTON ECKERT, ALAN JAMES, SUE FILSELL, A. W. (BILL). MUSK, GARY NOLAN, BARBARA DIXON, CHRIS O'DEA, JENNI SAVAGE, JANET STOCKS, MAUREEN P. SWANNEY, GRAHAM L. HALL and ON BEHALF OF THE ANZSRS REFERENCE RANGES WORKING PARTY

      Version of Record online: 25 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2011.01970.x

      The ‘all-age’ spirometry reference equations significantly advance the definition of the normal range of spirometry. The relevance of these equations for contemporary populations and methods has not been tested. Using collated spirometry data from healthy Australasian subjects we showed that the all-age spirometry equations provide good estimates for contemporary populations.

    2. Risk factors associated with fluoroquinolone-resistant tuberculosis in a Beijing tuberculosis referral hospital (pages 918–925)

      CUI HUA LIU, NAN YANG, QI WANG, YONG LIANG HU, LING LI, GUANG YU ZHANG and BAOLI ZHU

      Version of Record online: 25 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2011.01990.x

      This retrospective study of tuberculosis patients in Beijing demonstrates that in this cohort being unmarried, being a migrant, having had previous treatment for tuberculosis, having prior exposure to fluoroquinolones, having COPD or infection with multi-drug-resistant or poly-resistant tuberculosis are all risk factors associated with fluoroquinolone-resistant tuberculosis.

    3. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia: A clinical audit (pages 926–931)

      RAJESH THOMAS, JOHN FERGUSON, GEOFFREY COOMBS and PETER G GIBSON

      Version of Record online: 25 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2011.01965.x

      We describe the clinico-pathological characteristics of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia and report the emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus in Australia as a cause of community-acquired pneumonia resulting in severe morbidity and mortality in otherwise healthy persons.

    4. Detection of microorganisms in exhaled breath condensate during acute exacerbations of COPD (pages 932–938)

      TETYANA ZAKHARKINA, A.-REMBERT KOCZULLA, OLGA MARDANOVA, AKIRA HATTESOHL and ROBERT BALS

      Version of Record online: 25 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2011.01977.x

      EBC is a non-invasive method to assess airway biology. The aim of the present study was to evaluate EBC for the detection of microbial nucleic acids during AECOPD. Bacterial nucleic acids can be identified in EBC of COPD patients with exacerbations; however, the results differed significantly from those of sputum.

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      Cardiac autonomic dysfunction and health-related quality of life in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (pages 939–946)

      ARNOLDUS J.R. VAN GESTEL, MALCOLM KOHLER, JöRG STEIER, SEBASTIAN TESCHLER, ERICH W. RUSSI and HELMUT TESCHLER

      Version of Record online: 25 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2011.01992.x

      This study demonstrates that there is an association between cardiac autonomic dysfunction and impaired health-related quality of life in COPD. The results of the present study underline the importance of testing cardiac autonomic function, indexed by heart rate variability, in patients with COPD. Our findings imply that modification of cardiac autonomic dysfunction may be of benefit in the treatment of COPD patients and improve their outcome more than previously anticipated.

    6. Spirometry values in a Greek population: Is there an appropriate reference equation? (pages 947–952)

      THEODORE KONTAKIOTIS, AFRODITI K. BOUTOU, DIMITRIS IOANNIDIS, DESPINA PAPAKOSTA and PARASKEVI ARGYROPOULOU

      Version of Record online: 25 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2011.02002.x

      In a prospective study from Northern Greece, measured FVC and FEV1 values in healthy non-smokers differed from those predicted by widely used equations. The new locally derived reference equations, which are based on age and height, may be more suitable for the evaluation of lung function in this population.

    7. Plasma neutrophil elastase correlates with pulmonary vascular permeability: A prospective observational study in patients with pneumonia (pages 953–958)

      TAKASHI TAGAMI, SHIGEKI KUSHIMOTO, RYOICHI TOSA, MARIKO OMURA, KOHEI YONEZAWA, GO AKIYAMA, HISAO HIRAMA and HIROYUKI YOKOTA

      Version of Record online: 25 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2011.01997.x

      There was a significant correlation between plasma elastase levels and pulmonary vascular permeability, as measured by the single thermodilution technique using the PiCCO system, in patients with pneumonia who are at risk of ARDS.

    8. Factors predicting outcome following airway stenting for post-tuberculosis tracheobronchial stenosis (pages 959–964)

      SO YEON LIM, HYE KYEONG PARK, KYEONGMAN JEON, SANG-WON UM, WON-JUNG KOH, GEE YOUNG SUH, MAN PYO CHUNG, O JUNG KWON and HOJOONG KIM

      Version of Record online: 25 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2011.01998.x

      The purpose of this study was to investigate the prognostic factors in patients in whom a stent was inserted due to post-tuberculosis tracheobronchial stenosis. Airway stenting is most likely to be successful in patients with post-tuberculosis tracheobronchial stenosis when the intervention is performed within one month of atelectasis developing and before complete lobar atelectasis has occurred.

    9. Oesophageal applications of the convex curvilinear ultrasound bronchoscope; an illustrative case series (pages 965–968)

      WISSAM ABOUZGHEIB, YOUSEF SHWEIHAT and THADDEUS BARTTER

      Version of Record online: 25 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2011.01991.x

      Oesophageal access to mediastinal nodes with the endobronchial ultrasound scope is an active topic in the literature. Two recent publications have highlighted its utility. The authors wish to highlight non-nodal applications that have not been described and general criteria for the use of the oesophagus for diagnosis of thoracic disease.

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      Cough predicts prognosis in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (pages 969–975)

      CHRISTOPHER J. RYERSON, MARTA ABBRITTI, BRETT LEY, BRETT M. ELICKER, KIRK D. JONES and HAROLD R. COLLARD

      Version of Record online: 25 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2011.01996.x

      Cough in IPF is common, and is more prevalent in never-smokers and patients with more advanced disease. Cough is an independent predictor of disease progression and may predict time to death or lung transplantation in IPF.

    11. KL-6 and CEA levels in epithelial lining fluid microsamples predict response to gefitinib in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (pages 976–982)

      KAZUNORI KAMIYA, MASAZUMI WATANABE, MITSUTOMO KOHNO, YOTARO IZUMI, HIROHISA HORINOUCHI, MASAFUMI KAWAMURA, NAOKI SHIMADA and HIROAKI NOMORI

      Version of Record online: 25 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2011.02009.x

      Intrabronchial epithelial lining fluid levels of KL-6 and CEA near tumours, as assessed by bronchoscopic microsampling, predicted tumour response in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer who were treated with gefitinib, whereas serum levels did not.

    12. Heat shock protein 27 and cyclophilin A associate with the pathogenesis of COPD (pages 983–993)

      RUICHENG HU, QING OUYANG, AIGUO DAI, SHUANGXIANG TAN, ZHIQIANG XIAO and CENE TANG

      Version of Record online: 25 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2011.01993.x

      Using differential proteomics analysis, immunohistochemistry and western blotting, on lung tissue from never-smokers, non-COPD smokers and COPD smokers, heat shock protein 27 and cyclophilin A are shown to be overexpressed in the lungs of non-COPD smokers and further upregulated in COPD smokers, as compared with never-smokers.

    13. Gastro-oesophageal reflux, eosinophilic airway inflammation and chronic cough (pages 994–999)

      ADALBERTO PACHECO, VICENTA FARO, IGNACIO COBETA, ANA ROYUELA, IAN MOLYNEUX and ALYN H. MORICE

      Version of Record online: 25 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2011.02010.x

      This study provided support for an association between gastro-oesophageal reflux and EAI and raised the possibility that when exhaled nitric oxide levels are high, concurrent treatment of both entities, rather than corticosteroid therapy for EAI alone, may be required to achieve satisfactory responses to treatment in patients with chronic cough.

    14. The efficacy of chest radiographs in detecting parapneumonic effusions (pages 1000–1004)

      ANUPAMA G. BRIXEY, YIFENG LUO, VASILEIOS SKOURAS, ANNA AWDANKIEWICZ and RICHARD W. LIGHT

      Version of Record online: 25 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2011.02006.x

      This study investigated whether AP CXRs are useful in the evaluation of PPEs. We found that not only AP CXRs, but PA/lateral CXRs missed >10% of PPEs. The greatest risk for missed effusions was in patients with lower lobe consolidation, in whom clinicians should consider obtaining a thoracic ultrasound.

    15. Exhaled air dispersion and removal is influenced by isolation room size and ventilation settings during oxygen delivery via nasal cannula (pages 1005–1013)

      DAVID S. HUI, BENNY K. CHOW, LEO CHU, SUSANNA S. NG, SIK-TO LAI, TONY GIN and MATTHEW T.V. CHAN

      Version of Record online: 25 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2011.01995.x

      This study demonstrates that larger isolation rooms with 16 air exchanges/h (ACH) are relatively better than the smaller isolation room with 12 ACH in air mixing and dilution ventilation for removing exhaled air from the patient and preventing room contamination during administration of oxygen therapy.

  7. CLINICAL NOTE

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIALS
    3. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: RESPIRATORY HEALTH ISSUES IN THE ASIA-PACIFIC REGION
    4. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGIES
    5. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: PLEURAL DISEASE
    6. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: HOW TO SET UP PULMONARY SUBSPECIALTY SERVICES
    7. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    8. CLINICAL NOTE
    9. FORTHCOMING MEETINGS
    10. JOURNAL STATISTICS
    1. Lessons from eight cases of adult pulmonary toxocariasis: Abridged republication (pages 1014–1015)

      MASAHIDE YOSHIKAWA, NORIKOKO KOYAMA, SHIGETO HONTSU, YOSHIFUMI YAMAMOTO, KEI-ICHI MIKASA and HIROSHI KIMURA

      Version of Record online: 25 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2011.02000.x

  8. FORTHCOMING MEETINGS

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIALS
    3. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: RESPIRATORY HEALTH ISSUES IN THE ASIA-PACIFIC REGION
    4. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGIES
    5. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: PLEURAL DISEASE
    6. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: HOW TO SET UP PULMONARY SUBSPECIALTY SERVICES
    7. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    8. CLINICAL NOTE
    9. FORTHCOMING MEETINGS
    10. JOURNAL STATISTICS
    1. FORTHCOMING MEETINGS (page 1016)

      Version of Record online: 25 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2011.01838_1.x

  9. JOURNAL STATISTICS

    1. Top of page
    2. EDITORIALS
    3. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: RESPIRATORY HEALTH ISSUES IN THE ASIA-PACIFIC REGION
    4. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGIES
    5. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: PLEURAL DISEASE
    6. INVITED REVIEW SERIES: HOW TO SET UP PULMONARY SUBSPECIALTY SERVICES
    7. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    8. CLINICAL NOTE
    9. FORTHCOMING MEETINGS
    10. JOURNAL STATISTICS
    1. JOURNAL STATISTICS (page 1016)

      Version of Record online: 25 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2011.01838_2.x

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