Mesenchymal stem cells and the lung

Authors

  • Kenneth Sinclair,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
    • Queensland Lung Transplant Service, The Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
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  • Stephanie T. Yerkovich,

    1. Queensland Lung Transplant Service, The Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
    2. School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
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  • Daniel C. Chambers

    1. Queensland Lung Transplant Service, The Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
    2. School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
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  • The Authors: Kenneth Sinclair BSc Hons, is a PhD student at the University of Queensland whose research focuses on understanding the pulmonary mesenchymal stem cell hierarchy and how this interacts with the epithelium to contribute to lung maintenance and repair. Stephanie Yerkovich BSc Hons, PhD, is chief scientist at the Qld Lung Transplant Service with main research interests in the pathogenesis of lung fibrosis and immunity of respiratory disease. Daniel Chambers MBBS (Hons 1), MRCP, FRACP, MD, is a thoracic and transplant physician at the Qld Lung Transplant Service and Associate Professor at the School of Medicine, The University of Queensland. His main research interests include lung cell therapy, lung transplantation and the pathogenesis of lung fibrosis.
  • SERIES EDITORS: YUBEN MOODLEY AND PHILIP J. THOMPSON

Correspondence: Kenneth Sinclair, Queensland Lung Transplant Service, The Prince Charles Hospital, Level 5, Clinical Sciences Building, Brisbane, QLD 4032, Australia. Email: kenneth.sinclair@uqconnect.edu.au

Abstract

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a population of tissue-resident adult progenitor cells that were originally identified in bone marrow, but have now been identified in many organs including the lung. Although their precise role in organ function remains incompletely defined, mounting evidence suggests that they are an important component of the parenchymal progenitor cell niche and orchestrate organ homeostasis and repair following injury. In this review, what is known about MSC biology will be outlined with particular emphasis on lung biology, and the therapeutic potential of MSC-based cell therapy will also be highlighted.

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