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Significance

Cover image for Vol. 11 Issue 2

April 2014

Volume 11, Issue 2

Pages 2–48

  1. News

    1. Top of page
    2. News
    3. Features
    4. Focus
    5. Case Study
    6. Data Mine
    7. Visualisation
    8. Reviews
    9. Editorial/Letters/Crossward
    10. Variations
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  2. Features

    1. Top of page
    2. News
    3. Features
    4. Focus
    5. Case Study
    6. Data Mine
    7. Visualisation
    8. Reviews
    9. Editorial/Letters/Crossward
    10. Variations
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      Gun law and crime (pages 6–8)

      Mark Gius

      Version of Record online: 2 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1740-9713.2014.00732.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Gun control divides America. Mass shootings there make headlines. Do tougher laws against carrying concealed weapons lead to fewer murders? Mark Gius looks at the statistics.

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      Deterrence and the death penalty: Why the statistics should be ignored (pages 9–13)

      Daniel Nagin

      Version of Record online: 2 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1740-9713.2014.00733.x

      Some US states execute murderers. Some do not. Does capital punishment deter potential killers? Daniel Nagin explains why all existing attempts to answer the question are fatally flawed.

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      Joined up justice: Understanding the links between employment, benefits and offending (pages 14–19)

      Melissa Wingfield and Paul Trenell

      Version of Record online: 2 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1740-9713.2014.00734.x

      Prison, unemployment, re-offending, prison again… The cycle is a common one, but data to understand it has been split between different government departments. Melissa Wingfield and Paul Trenell joined up the data to break the cycle.

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      The Erebus, the Terror and the North-West Passage: Did lead really poison Franklin's lost expedition? (pages 20–26)

      Keith Millar, Adrian Bowman and William Battersby

      Version of Record online: 2 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1740-9713.2014.00735.x

      A famous analysis of bodies from a doomed Polar expedition concluded that its men had been poisoned by lead from their canned food. But Keith Millar, Adrian Bowman and William Battersby find that variation between individuals cast doubt on that conclusion.

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      Dr Fisher's casebook: Primary colours (page 27)

      Version of Record online: 2 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1740-9713.2014.00736.x

      The doctor sees red – but not necessarily green.

  3. Focus

    1. Top of page
    2. News
    3. Features
    4. Focus
    5. Case Study
    6. Data Mine
    7. Visualisation
    8. Reviews
    9. Editorial/Letters/Crossward
    10. Variations
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      Data and the law: Beyond the sweat of the brow: Who owns published data? And what is data? (pages 28–31)

      Gerald van Belle and Leslie Ruiter

      Version of Record online: 2 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1740-9713.2014.00737.x

      The height of Everest, the entries in a phone book, the results of an IQ test: all are data, and the Supreme Court has ruled that data are facts and no-one can copyright them. So why are authors having to pay to use facts? Gerald van Belle and Leslie Ruiter find that a fact is a fact is a fact – but the law can make curious distinctions.

  4. Case Study

    1. Top of page
    2. News
    3. Features
    4. Focus
    5. Case Study
    6. Data Mine
    7. Visualisation
    8. Reviews
    9. Editorial/Letters/Crossward
    10. Variations
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      Health freaks on trial: Duct tape, bull semen and the call of television (pages 32–35)

      Martin Bland

      Version of Record online: 2 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1740-9713.2014.00738.x

      Clinical trials on TV? Martin Bland found ten minute of fame, a new statistical test of significance – and a wonderful new cure for verrucas.

  5. Data Mine

    1. Top of page
    2. News
    3. Features
    4. Focus
    5. Case Study
    6. Data Mine
    7. Visualisation
    8. Reviews
    9. Editorial/Letters/Crossward
    10. Variations
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      Alphonse Bertillon and the measure of man: More expert than Sherlock Holmes (pages 36–39)

      Richard Farebrother and Julian Champkin

      Version of Record online: 2 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1740-9713.2014.00739.x

      Bertillon died in the spring of 1914. In his centenary year Richard Farebrother and Julian Champkin look at the bad-tempered and appallingly obstinate policeman whose system of measuring the human body founded modern police techniques – and aroused the ire of Sherlock Holmes.

  6. Visualisation

    1. Top of page
    2. News
    3. Features
    4. Focus
    5. Case Study
    6. Data Mine
    7. Visualisation
    8. Reviews
    9. Editorial/Letters/Crossward
    10. Variations
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      Victorian eyes: Literary, statistical, and artistic perspectives on Victorian novels – and Dickens's unfinished murder mystery (pages 40–43)

      Catherine DeRose, Carrie Roy and Fred Boehm

      Version of Record online: 2 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1740-9713.2014.00740.x

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An artist, a literary historian and a statistician walk the blurry line between art and representing data.

  7. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. News
    3. Features
    4. Focus
    5. Case Study
    6. Data Mine
    7. Visualisation
    8. Reviews
    9. Editorial/Letters/Crossward
    10. Variations
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      Reviews (page 44)

      Version of Record online: 2 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1740-9713.2014.00741.x

  8. Editorial/Letters/Crossward

    1. Top of page
    2. News
    3. Features
    4. Focus
    5. Case Study
    6. Data Mine
    7. Visualisation
    8. Reviews
    9. Editorial/Letters/Crossward
    10. Variations
    1. You have free access to this content
  9. Variations

    1. Top of page
    2. News
    3. Features
    4. Focus
    5. Case Study
    6. Data Mine
    7. Visualisation
    8. Reviews
    9. Editorial/Letters/Crossward
    10. Variations
    1. You have free access to this content
      Justice is a full cooked breakfast with trimmings (pages 47–48)

      Julian Champkin

      Version of Record online: 2 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1740-9713.2014.00743.x

      Just how much does a good meal weigh in the scales of justice? Julian Champkin finds it is disturbingly heavy.

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