Women with Gynecologic Malignancies Have a Greater Incidence of Suicide than Women with Other Cancer Types

Authors

  • Kristy K. Ward MD,

    Corresponding author
    • Department of Reproductive Medicine, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Rebecca and John Moores UCSD Cancer Center, La Jolla, CA, USA
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  • Angelica M. Roncancio PhD,

    1. The University of Texas School of Public Health, Center for Health Promotion and Prevention Research, Houston, TX, USA
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  • Steven C. Plaxe MD

    1. Department of Reproductive Medicine, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Rebecca and John Moores UCSD Cancer Center, La Jolla, CA, USA
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  • Dr. Roncancio is supported by an NIH/NCI “Supplement to Promote Diversity in Health Related Research” grant #U54CA153505-01S1.

Address correspondence to Kristy K. Ward, Department of Reproductive Medicine, UCSD Moores Cancer Center, 3855 Health Sciences Dr., #0987, La Jolla, CA 92093-0987, USA; E-mail: kristy.kay.ward@gmail.com

Abstract

To evaluate risk of suicide of women with invasive gynecologic malignancies, the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (1973–2007) was queried. Suicide per 100,000 women with gynecologic malignancies was compared with that of women with other malignancies; suicide was 30% more likely in those with gynecologic malignancies. Most suicides occurred within 4 years of diagnosis. Better understanding of the descriptive epidemiology of suicide among women with gynecologic malignancies could lead to improved risk assessment, screening, and prevention of this potentially avoidable cause of death.

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