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Meaning Made of Stress among Veterans Transitioning to College: Examining Unique Associations with Suicide Risk and Life-Threatening Behavior

Authors

  • Jason M. Holland PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychology, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV, USA
    • Address correspondence to Jason M. Holland, Department of Psychology, University of Nevada, 4505 S. Maryland Pkwy., Box 455030, Las Vegas, NV 89154-5030; E-mail: jason.holland@unlv.edu

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  • Jesse Malott MA, MDiv,

    1. Department of Clinical Psychology, Fuller Theological Seminary, Pasadena, CA, USA
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  • Joseph M. Currier PhD

    1. Department of Clinical Psychology, Fuller Theological Seminary, Pasadena, CA, USA
    2. Department of Psychology, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL, USA
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Abstract

Meaning made of stress has been shown to be a unique predictor of mental and physical health. In this study, we examined the unique associations between two facets of meaning made of stress (comprehensibility and footing in the world) and suicide risk and life-threatening behavior among military veterans who have transitioned to college were examined, controlling for demographic factors, religiousness, combat-related physical injury, combat exposure, depressive symptoms, and posttraumatic stress symptoms. Findings suggest that comprehensibility (having “made sense” of a stressor) is uniquely associated with lower suicide risk and a lower likelihood of driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol and engaging in self-mutilating behaviors.

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