Mediators of the Daily Hassles–Suicidal Ideation Link in African American Women

Authors

  • Dorian A. Lamis PhD,

    1. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA
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  • Nadine J. Kaslow PhD, ABPP

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA
    • Address correspondence to Nadine J. Kaslow, PhD, ABPP, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Grady Hospital, 80 Jesse Hill Jr. Drive, Atlanta, GA 30303; E-mail: Nkaslow@emory.edu

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  • This research was supported by grants from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (R49 CCR421767-01, Group interventions with suicidal African American women) and the National Institute of Mental Health (1R01MH078002-01A2, Group interviews for abused, suicidal Black women) awarded to Dr. Nadine J. Kaslow.

Abstract

Depressive symptoms and hopelessness as mediators of the daily hassles–suicidal ideation link in low-income African American women exposed to intimate partner violence (= 100) were investigated. As hypothesized, daily hassles, depressive symptoms, and hopelessness were each significantly and positively associated with suicidal ideation. Moreover, the relation between daily hassles and suicidal ideation was, in part, accounted for by depressive symptoms and hopelessness. This study demonstrates the importance of assessing for the presence of these risk factors when determining the likelihood that an abused African American woman will consider suicide. The findings further highlight the value of designing and implementing interventions that target the reduction in depressive symptoms and hopelessness in abused African American women exposed to daily hassles to reduce their suicide risk.

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