Self-Efficacy to Avoid Suicidal Action: Factor Structure and Convergent Validity among Adults in Substance Use Disorder Treatment

Authors

  • Ewa K. Czyz MS,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
    2. Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
    • Address correspondence to Ewa K. Czyz, Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109; E-mail: ewac@umich.edu

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  • Amy S. B. Bohnert PhD,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
    2. Department of Veterans Affairs Healthcare System, VA Serious Mental Illness Treatment Resource and Evaluation Center (SMITREC), Ann Arbor, MI, USA
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  • Cheryl A. King PhD,

    1. Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
    2. Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
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  • Amanda M. Price MS,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
    2. Department of Veterans Affairs Healthcare System, VA Serious Mental Illness Treatment Resource and Evaluation Center (SMITREC), Ann Arbor, MI, USA
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  • Felicia Kleinberg MSW,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
    2. Department of Veterans Affairs Healthcare System, VA Serious Mental Illness Treatment Resource and Evaluation Center (SMITREC), Ann Arbor, MI, USA
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  • Mark A. Ilgen PhD

    1. Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
    2. Department of Veterans Affairs Healthcare System, VA Serious Mental Illness Treatment Resource and Evaluation Center (SMITREC), Ann Arbor, MI, USA
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  • This research was supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), Grant# R21DA026925.

Abstract

Individuals with substance use disorders (SUDs) are at high risk of suicidal behaviors, highlighting the need for an improved understanding of potentially influential factors. One such domain is self-efficacy to manage suicidal thoughts and impulses. Psychometric data about the Self-Efficacy to Avoid Suicidal Action (SEASA) Scale within a sample of adults seeking SUD treatment (N = 464) is provided. Exploratory factor analysis supported a single self-efficacy construct. Lower SEASA scores, or lower self-efficacy, were reported in those with more severe suicidal ideation and those with more suicide attempts, providing evidence for convergent validity. Implications of measuring self-efficacy in the context of suicide risk assessment are discussed.

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