Football training improves cardiovascular health profile in sedentary, premenopausal hypertensive women

Authors

  • M. Mohr,

    Corresponding author
    1. Sport and Health Sciences, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, St. Luke's Campus, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK
    2. Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden
    3. Faculty of Natural and Health Sciences, University of the Faroe Islands, Torshavn, Faroe Islands
    • Corresponding author: Magni Mohr, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, St. Luke's Campus, Heavitree Road, Exeter EX1 2LU, UK. Tel: +44 1392724759, Fax: +44 1392 264726, E-mail: m.mohr@exeter.ac.uk

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  • A. Lindenskov,

    1. The Faroese Confederation of Sports and Olympic Committee, Torshavn, Faroe Islands
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  • P. M. Holm,

    1. Institute of Sport Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark
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  • H. P. Nielsen,

    1. Southern Hospital, The Faroese Hospital System, Torshavn, Faroe Islands
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  • J. Mortensen,

    1. Department of Medicine, The Faroese National Hospital, Torshavn, Faroe Islands
    2. Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark
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  • P. Weihe,

    1. Department of Occupational Medicine and Public Health, The Faroese Hospital System, Torshavn, Faroe Islands
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  • P. Krustrup

    1. Sport and Health Sciences, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, St. Luke's Campus, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK
    2. Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, Copenhagen Centre for Team Sport and Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
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Abstract

The present study examined the effects of short-term recreational football training on blood pressure (BP), fat mass, and fitness in sedentary, 35–50-year-old premenopausal women with mild hypertension. Forty-one untrained, hypertensive women were randomized into a football training group (n = 21; FTG) and a control group (n = 20; CON). FTG performed 45 ± 1 1-h small-sided football training sessions during the 15-week intervention period. BP, body composition (dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry), blood lipid profile, and fitness level were determined pre- and post-intervention. After 15 weeks, systolic and diastolic BP, respectively, were lowered more (P < 0.05) in FTG (−12 ± 3 and −6 ± 2 mmHg) than in CON (−1 ± 1 and 1 ± 2 mmHg). Total body fat mass decreased more (P < 0.05) in FTG than in CON during the 15-week intervention period (−2.3 ± 0.5 kg vs 0.4 ± 0.3 kg). After 15 weeks, both total cholesterol (−0.4 ± 0.1 mmol/L vs 0.1 ± 0.2 mmol/L) and triglyceride (−0.2 ± 0.1 mmol/L vs 0.3 ± 0.2 mmol/L) were lowered more (P < 0.05) in FTG than in CON. Yo-Yo intermittent endurance level 1 test performance increased more (P < 0.05) in FTG than in CON (111 ± 18% vs 1 ± 3%) during the 15-week intervention period. In conclusion, short-term football training resulted in a marked reduction in BP and induced multiple improvements in fitness and cardiovascular health profile of untrained, premenopausal women with mild hypertension.

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