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HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1 and -DQB1 allele and haplotype frequencies in Saudis using next generation sequencing technique

Authors

  • A. H. Hajeer,

    Corresponding author
    1. College of Medicine, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
    • Department of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, King Abdulaziz Medical City, National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
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  • M. A. Al Balwi,

    1. Department of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, King Abdulaziz Medical City, National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
    2. College of Medicine, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
    3. King Abdullah International Medical Research Centre, King Abdulaziz Medical City, National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
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  • F. Aytül Uyar,

    1. Department of Physiology, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey
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  • Y. AlHaidan,

    1. King Abdullah International Medical Research Centre, King Abdulaziz Medical City, National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
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  • A. AlAbdulrahman,

    1. King Abdullah International Medical Research Centre, King Abdulaziz Medical City, National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
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  • I. Al Abdulkareem,

    1. Department of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, King Abdulaziz Medical City, National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
    2. King Abdullah International Medical Research Centre, King Abdulaziz Medical City, National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
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  • M. Al Jumah

    1. College of Medicine, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
    2. King Abdullah International Medical Research Centre, King Abdulaziz Medical City, National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
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Correspondence

Dr Ali Hajeer

Department of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine

King Abdulaziz Medical City

National Guard Health Affairs, PO Box 22490

Riyadh 11426

Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Tel: +966 11 801 11 11

Fax: +966 11 801 2192

e-mail: hajeera@ngha.med.sa

Abstract

Next generation sequencing (NGS) is a promising technique that can reveal the entire gene sequences and to the highest possible resolution without any phase ambiguities. We have used this technique to investigate the frequencies of HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1 and -DQB1 in a Saudi cohort of healthy individuals. We used NGS using the 454 genome sequence (GS) FLX System and Conexio assign atf 454 software to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotype eight class I and class II loci. A total of 158 healthy Saudi adults were analyzed. The most frequently observed allele for HLA-A was HLA-A*02:01:01:01 (13.6%); for HLA-B, HLA-B*50:01:01 (15.8%); for HLA-C, HLA-C*06:02:01:01 (18.7%); for HLA-DRB1, HLA-DRB1*07:01:01:01 (26.6%); and for HLA-DQB1, HLA-DQB1*02:01:01 (20.3%). The most common four loci haplotypes in the Saudi population were HLA-A*24:02:01:01-B*08:01:01-C*07:02:01:01-DRB1*03:01:01:01 and HLA-A*23:01:01-B*50:01:01-C*06:02:01:01-DRB1*07:01:01:01.. We have used a highly informative technique for HLA typing of a Saudi healthy cohort to establish allele and haplotype frequencies. These results should prove useful for population studies, disease associations and future planning of the unrelated bone marrow donor registry.

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