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Malaria

  1. Top of page
  2. Malaria
  3. Leishmaniasis
  4. Toxoplasmosis
  5. Care for survivors of sexual violence
  6. Drinking water
  7. Noncommunicable diseases
  8. HIV/AIDS
  9. Dengue
  10. Health policy

Large dams may intensify malaria transmission in nearby communities because they create more vector breeding sites through the reservoir. Complementing current malaria control strategies with source reduction could help reduce malaria in reservoir communities. 1320–1328

An evaluation of antifolate resistance in Kolkata implies that due to enormous drug pressure a novel AGEAT mutation is highly correlated (P < 0.01) with sulfadoxine resistance. 1329–1334

Leishmaniasis

  1. Top of page
  2. Malaria
  3. Leishmaniasis
  4. Toxoplasmosis
  5. Care for survivors of sexual violence
  6. Drinking water
  7. Noncommunicable diseases
  8. HIV/AIDS
  9. Dengue
  10. Health policy

L. major is the most common species in areas endemic for cutaneous leishmaniasis in 11 provinces of Iran. Genetic diversity is a common feature of L. major in the country. 1335–1344

Post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis prevalence in visceral leishmaniasis-endemic communities in Bihar ranged from 4.4 to 7.8 per 10 000 individuals when PKDL-confirmed or probable cases were considered respectively. 1345–1348

Toxoplasmosis

  1. Top of page
  2. Malaria
  3. Leishmaniasis
  4. Toxoplasmosis
  5. Care for survivors of sexual violence
  6. Drinking water
  7. Noncommunicable diseases
  8. HIV/AIDS
  9. Dengue
  10. Health policy

Post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis prevalence in visceral-leishmaniasis endemic communities in Bihar ranged from 4.4 to 7.8 per 10 000 individuals when PKDL-confirmed or probable cases were considered respectively. 1349–1355

Care for survivors of sexual violence

  1. Top of page
  2. Malaria
  3. Leishmaniasis
  4. Toxoplasmosis
  5. Care for survivors of sexual violence
  6. Drinking water
  7. Noncommunicable diseases
  8. HIV/AIDS
  9. Dengue
  10. Health policy

There are a number of gaps in Médecins Sans Frontières’ approach to sexual violence in Liberia. A study suggests how it could be adapted to better meet survivor needs. 1356–1360

Drinking water

  1. Top of page
  2. Malaria
  3. Leishmaniasis
  4. Toxoplasmosis
  5. Care for survivors of sexual violence
  6. Drinking water
  7. Noncommunicable diseases
  8. HIV/AIDS
  9. Dengue
  10. Health policy

Two years after the tsunami in Sri Lanka, 24% of households had ceased using water filters, mainly due to breakage or because they had started to use another water source. Households with taps were more likely to stop using filters than households with wells. Tap water users also had better source water, suggesting that disuse is not necessarily negative. 1361–1368

Noncommunicable diseases

  1. Top of page
  2. Malaria
  3. Leishmaniasis
  4. Toxoplasmosis
  5. Care for survivors of sexual violence
  6. Drinking water
  7. Noncommunicable diseases
  8. HIV/AIDS
  9. Dengue
  10. Health policy

Prevalence of overweight and obesity among Nigerian schoolchildren implicates the need for periodic surveillance of body disorders to facilitate implementation of preventive health promotion strategies. 1369–1375

The rural poor in India with noncommunicable diseases need more care and pay more for services than those with communicable diseases; informal intra-family cross-subsidization covers excessive costs. A fairer systemic solution is needed. 1376–1385

HIV/AIDS

  1. Top of page
  2. Malaria
  3. Leishmaniasis
  4. Toxoplasmosis
  5. Care for survivors of sexual violence
  6. Drinking water
  7. Noncommunicable diseases
  8. HIV/AIDS
  9. Dengue
  10. Health policy

In South Africa the addition of a single viral load measurement in children identified as failing immunologically will prevent most switches to second-line treatment in virologically suppressed children. 1386–1390

Dengue

  1. Top of page
  2. Malaria
  3. Leishmaniasis
  4. Toxoplasmosis
  5. Care for survivors of sexual violence
  6. Drinking water
  7. Noncommunicable diseases
  8. HIV/AIDS
  9. Dengue
  10. Health policy

In Salvador dengue virus is in active circulation during early childhood; consequently, children have heterotypic antibodies and run a high risk of developing DHF. Health authorities need to improve health care, particularly for the paediatric population, and vector control measures. 1391–1395

Health policy

  1. Top of page
  2. Malaria
  3. Leishmaniasis
  4. Toxoplasmosis
  5. Care for survivors of sexual violence
  6. Drinking water
  7. Noncommunicable diseases
  8. HIV/AIDS
  9. Dengue
  10. Health policy

In rural southern Tanzania adult mortality attributed to communicable and non-communicable diseases and accident/injuries is rising. Interventions targeting prevention of this triple disease burden in adults are required. 1396–1404

There is variation across SSA in the use of non-physician cataract surgeons. Placement and support after training does not always follow expectations. More evidence is necessary before increasing this cadre. 1405–1408

To achieve ‘no health without research’, funding for capacity building and for assessing continuously what works and what does not work needs to be increased, to make the best of the available resources and time, and address our past failures. 1409–1411

Poor-quality medical products threaten public health in poor settings. We hope that the intergovernmental mechanism created by the 65th WHA will prevent the use of all poor quality medical products, not only counterfeits. 1412–1416

Bolivian immigrants influence the incidence but not the trends of TB among Brazilians in São Paulo. There are no significant differences between Bolivians and Brazilians regarding health care access or treatment outcome. Guaranteed universal health care access for all, including undocumented individuals, contributes to health equity. 1417–1424