Impaired sterol ester synthesis alters the response of Arabidopsis thaliana to Phytophthora infestans

Authors

  • Michaela Kopischke,

    1. Department of Stress and Developmental Biology, Leibniz Institute of Plant Biochemistry, Halle (Saale), Germany
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Plant Cell Biology, Georg-August-University Göttingen, Schwann-Schleiden Centre, Göttingen, Germany
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  • Lore Westphal,

    1. Department of Stress and Developmental Biology, Leibniz Institute of Plant Biochemistry, Halle (Saale), Germany
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  • Korbinian Schneeberger,

    1. Department of Molecular Biology, Max-Planck-Institute for Developmental Biology, Tübingen, Germany
    Current affiliation:
    1. Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, Cologne, Germany
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  • Richard Clark,

    1. Department of Molecular Biology, Max-Planck-Institute for Developmental Biology, Tübingen, Germany
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
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  • Stephan Ossowski,

    1. Department of Molecular Biology, Max-Planck-Institute for Developmental Biology, Tübingen, Germany
    Current affiliation:
    1. Genomic and Epigenomic Variation in Disease Group, Genes and Disease Program, Center for Genomic Regulation (CRG), UPF, Barcelona, Spain
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  • Vera Wewer,

    1. Institute of Molecular Physiology and Biotechnology of Plants, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany
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  • René Fuchs,

    1. Department of Plant Cell Biology, Georg-August-University Göttingen, Schwann-Schleiden Centre, Göttingen, Germany
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  • Jörn Landtag,

    1. Department of Stress and Developmental Biology, Leibniz Institute of Plant Biochemistry, Halle (Saale), Germany
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  • Gerd Hause,

    1. Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Biocenter, Halle (Saale), Germany
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  • Peter Dörmann,

    1. Institute of Molecular Physiology and Biotechnology of Plants, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany
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  • Volker Lipka,

    1. Department of Plant Cell Biology, Georg-August-University Göttingen, Schwann-Schleiden Centre, Göttingen, Germany
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  • Detlef Weigel,

    1. Department of Molecular Biology, Max-Planck-Institute for Developmental Biology, Tübingen, Germany
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  • Paul Schulze-Lefert,

    1. Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, Köln, Germany
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  • Dierk Scheel,

    1. Department of Stress and Developmental Biology, Leibniz Institute of Plant Biochemistry, Halle (Saale), Germany
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  • Sabine Rosahl

    Corresponding author
    • Department of Stress and Developmental Biology, Leibniz Institute of Plant Biochemistry, Halle (Saale), Germany
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For Correspondence (e-mail srosahl@ipb-halle.de).

Summary

Non-host resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana against Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of late blight disease of potato, depends on efficient extracellular pre- and post-invasive resistance responses. Pre-invasive resistance against P. infestans requires the myrosinase PEN2. To identify additional genes involved in non-host resistance to P. infestans, a genetic screen was performed by re-mutagenesis of pen2 plants. Fourteen independent mutants were isolated that displayed an enhanced response to Phytophthora (erp) phenotype. Upon inoculation with P. infestans, two mutants, pen2-1 erp1-3 and pen2-1 erp1-4, showed an enhanced rate of mesophyll cell death and produced excessive callose deposits in the mesophyll cell layer. ERP1 encodes a phospholipid:sterol acyltransferase (PSAT1) that catalyzes the formation of sterol esters. Consistent with this, the tested T-DNA insertion lines of PSAT1 are phenocopies of erp1 plants. Sterol ester levels are highly reduced in all erp1/psat1 mutants, whereas sterol glycoside levels are increased twofold. Excessive callose deposition occurred independently of PMR4/GSL5 activity, a known pathogen-inducible callose synthase. A similar formation of aberrant callose deposits was triggered by the inoculation of erp1 psat1 plants with powdery mildew. These results suggest a role for sterol conjugates in cell non-autonomous defense responses against invasive filamentous pathogens.

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