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The Plant Journal

Cover image for Vol. 85 Issue 1

January 2016

Volume 85, Issue 1

Pages 1–176

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. FEATURED ARTICLE
    4. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    5. RESOURCE
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      Issue Information - TOC (page 1)

      Version of Record online: 30 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/tpj.12968

  2. FEATURED ARTICLE

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. FEATURED ARTICLE
    4. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
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      Germostatin resistance locus 1 encodes a PHD finger protein involved in auxin-mediated seed dormancy and germination (pages 3–15)

      Yajin Ye, Ziying Gong, Xiao Lu, Deyan Miao, Jianmin Shi, Juan Lu and Yang Zhao

      Version of Record online: 30 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/tpj.13086

      Significance Statement

      Auxin is a positive regulator of seed dormancy and a negative regulator during seed germination, but the molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Here we used chemical genetics to identify a small molecule, germostatin, which inhibits seed germination by enhancing auxin responses. Resistance to germostatin is due to a homodomain protein encoded by GSR1, and we suggest that it acts together with the transcriptional repressor ARF16 and IAA17 to regulate seed germination.

  3. ORIGINAL ARTICLES

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    2. Issue Information
    3. FEATURED ARTICLE
    4. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    5. RESOURCE
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      The tomato HD-Zip I transcription factor SlHZ24 modulates ascorbate accumulation through positive regulation of the d-mannose/l-galactose pathway (pages 16–29)

      Tixu Hu, Jie Ye, Peiwen Tao, Hanxia Li, Junhong Zhang, Yuyang Zhang and Zhibiao Ye

      Version of Record online: 26 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/tpj.13085

      Significance Statement

      Ascorbate is an antioxidant that can scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we show that a tomato HD-Zip I transcription factor directly regulates ascorbate biosynthetic genes, thereby enhancing stress tolerance.

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      Molecular insights into the function of the viral RNA silencing suppressor HCPro (pages 30–45)

      Konstantin I. Ivanov, Katri Eskelin, Marta Bašić, Swarnalok De, Andres Lõhmus, Markku Varjosalo and Kristiina Mäkinen

      Version of Record online: 30 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/tpj.13088

      Significance Statement

      Although HCPro is a well-characterized suppressor of antiviral RNA silencing, its mechanism of action is not fully understood. The results of the present study suggest two putative mechanisms by which potyvirus-specific complexes containing HCPro are involved in suppression of RNA silencing. The first is through local disruption of the methionine cycle to block sRNA methylation. The second mechanism is the relief of viral RNA translational repression by ribosome-associated multiprotein complexes containing HCPro.

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      Serotonin attenuates biotic stress and leads to lesion browning caused by a hypersensitive response to Magnaporthe oryzae penetration in rice (pages 46–56)

      Keiko Hayashi, Yoshikatsu Fujita, Taketo Ashizawa, Fumihiko Suzuki, Yoshiaki Nagamura and Yuriko Hayano-Saito

      Version of Record online: 26 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/tpj.13083

      Significance Statement

      The hypersensitive response (HR) prevents pathogen spread by causing localized cell death. Here we show that serotonin, acting as a scavenger for reactive oxygen species, protects uninfected tissues from oxidative damage caused by the HR.

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      A pioneer protein is part of a large complex involved in trans-splicing of a group II intron in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (pages 57–69)

      Linnka Lefebvre-Legendre, Olga Reifschneider, Laxmikanth Kollipara, Albert Sickmann, Dirk Wolters, Ulrich Kück and Michel Goldschmidt-Clermont

      Version of Record online: 30 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/tpj.13089

      Significance Statement

      Trans-splicing of a group II intron in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii specifically requires Raa7, a protein lacking any known domains or motifs. Raa7 assembles, together with other previously identified nucleus-encoded factors, into a multimeric splicing complex. The formation of such large complexes is interesting in an evolutionary perspective, since group II introns are proposed to be ancestral to nuclear spliceosomal introns, with which they share mechanistic and structural features.

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      A highly specific microRNA-mediated mechanism silences LTR retrotransposons of strawberry (pages 70–82)

      Nada Šurbanovski, Matteo Brilli, Mirko Moser and Azeddine Si-Ammour

      Version of Record online: 30 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/tpj.13090

      Significance Statement

      Transcriptional gene silencing of transposons is usually attributed to small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Here we show that a microRNA, miR1511, post-transcriptionally silences LTR retrotransposons by targeting the evolutionary conserved primer binding site required for reverse transcription. We suggest that this silencing mechanism might be widespread as other miRNA families share core sequence identity with miR1511.

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      Activation of autophagy by unfolded proteins during endoplasmic reticulum stress (pages 83–95)

      Xiaochen Yang, Renu Srivastava, Stephen H. Howell and Diane C. Bassham

      Version of Record online: 30 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/tpj.13091

      Significance Statement

      Accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is defined as ER stress, which elicits the unfolded protein response (UPR) and induces autophagy. Although the mechanism for the induction of the UPR is clear, it was possible that autophagy induction was due to the anti-metabolic properties of ER stress agents, such as tunicamycin and dithiothreitol. Here we show that the unfolded proteins themselves are the actual inducers of ER stress-induced autophagy.

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      WRKY71 accelerates flowering via the direct activation of FLOWERING LOCUS T and LEAFY in Arabidopsis thaliana (pages 96–106)

      Yanchong Yu, Zhenhua Liu, Long Wang, Sang-Gyu Kim, Pil J. Seo, Meng Qiao, Nan Wang, Shuo Li, Xiaofeng Cao, Chung-Mo Park and Fengning Xiang

      Version of Record online: 30 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/tpj.13092

      Significance Statement

      WRKY transcription factors have primarily been studied with respect to their roles in pathogen defence and abiotic stresses. Here we show that WRKY71 accelerates flowering of Arabidopsis by binding to the promoters of key flowering genes.

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      Tomato fruit carotenoid biosynthesis is adjusted to actual ripening progression by a light-dependent mechanism (pages 107–119)

      Briardo Llorente, Lucio D'Andrea, M. Aguila Ruiz-Sola, Esther Botterweg, Pablo Pulido, Jordi Andilla, Pablo Loza-Alvarez and Manuel Rodriguez-Concepcion

      Version of Record online: 30 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/tpj.13094

      Significance Statement

      Phytochrome interacting factors (PIFs) are key components in perceiving shade. Here we show that tomato fruit adapted PIFs to sense and monitor the progression of ripening and the production of carotenoids. We further show that this mechanism can be manipulated to increase the levels of health-promoting carotenoids in tomatoes.

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      SUMOylation represses SnRK1 signaling in Arabidopsis (pages 120–133)

      Pierre Crozet, Leonor Margalha, Rafal Butowt, Noémia Fernandes, Carlos A. Elias, Beatriz Orosa, Konstantin Tomanov, Markus Teige, Andreas Bachmair, Ari Sadanandom and Elena Baena-González

      Version of Record online: 30 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/tpj.13096

      Significance Statement

      The SnRK1 protein kinase is crucial for tolerance to environmental stress and for a wide range of plant growth and developmental processes, but how its activity is regulated is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that SnRK1 activity causes its own SUMOylation and subsequent ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation, thus establishing a negative feedback loop that attenuates SnRK1 signaling and prevents detrimental sustained activation of stress responses.

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      The cytokinin response factors modulate root and shoot growth and promote leaf senescence in Arabidopsis (pages 134–147)

      Tracy Raines, Carly Shanks, Chia-Yi Cheng, Duncan McPherson, Cristiana T. Argueso, Hyo J. Kim, José M. Franco-Zorrilla, Irene López-Vidriero, Roberto Solano, Radomíra Vaňková, G. Eric Schaller and Joseph J. Kieber

      Version of Record online: 30 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/tpj.13097

      Significance Statement

      We show that the CRFs have pleiotropic roles in plant growth and development, including processes linked to cytokinin such as root meristem size, shoot growth, and leaf senescence. The role of the CRFs in these processes is at least in part independent of cytokinin, suggesting that cytokinin and the CRFs interact in a complex manner to regulate plant development.

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      Transgenic tobacco plants with improved cyanobacterial Rubisco expression but no extra assembly factors grow at near wild-type rates if provided with elevated CO2 (pages 148–160)

      Alessandro Occhialini, Myat T. Lin, P. John Andralojc, Maureen R. Hanson and Martin A. J. Parry

      Version of Record online: 30 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/tpj.13098

      Significance Statement

      Photosynthesis in vascular plants is not optimally efficient, because Rubisco is slow and photorespiration occurs; in cyanobacteria Rubisco is faster, carboxysomes concentrate CO2 near Rubisco, and much less nitrogen is required. Here we optimized expression and showed that cyanobacterial Rubisco functions in tobacco chloroplasts without any added cyanobacterial chaperones. Transgenic plants with up to 10-fold less cyanobacterial Rubisco grew nearly as fast as wild-type plants in elevated CO2 conditions. These findings highlight potential gains in photosynthetic and nitrogen use efficiency that can be achieved with cyanobacterial Rubisco, if a complete carbon concentrating mechanism can be installed.

  4. RESOURCE

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. FEATURED ARTICLE
    4. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    5. RESOURCE
    1. You have free access to this content
      Flux balance analysis of primary metabolism in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum (pages 161–176)

      Joomi Kim, Michele Fabris, Gino Baart, Min K. Kim, Alain Goossens, Wim Vyverman, Paul G. Falkowski and Desmond S. Lun

      Version of Record online: 30 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/tpj.13081

      Significance Statement

      Diatoms are excellent candidates for sustainable biodiesel feedstocks. Diatoms have enzymes of lower glycolysis in their mitochondria, perhaps relics of ancient eukaryotic metabolism. Here we provide a genome-scale metabolic model that allows several predictions for improving carbon availability for lipid synthesis, and additionally explores several unusual features of diatoms that might be relevant for determining the role and origin of mitochondrial glycolytic enzymes.

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