The Plant Journal

Cover image for Vol. 88 Issue 2

October 2016

Volume 88, Issue 2

Pages 157–342

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. FEATURED ARTICLE
    4. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    5. RESOURCE
    6. TECHNICAL ADVANCE
    1. Table of Contents (page 157)

      Version of Record online: 14 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/tpj.12987

  2. FEATURED ARTICLE

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. FEATURED ARTICLE
    4. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    5. RESOURCE
    6. TECHNICAL ADVANCE
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Molecular, genetic and evolutionary analysis of a paracentric inversion in Arabidopsis thaliana (pages 159–178)

      Paul Fransz, Gabriella Linc, Cheng-Ruei Lee, Saulo Alves Aflitos, Jesse R. Lasky, Christopher Toomajian, Hoda Ali, Janny Peters, Peter van Dam, Xianwen Ji, Mateusz Kuzak, Tom Gerats, Ingo Schubert, Korbinian Schneeberger, Vincent Colot, Rob Martienssen, Maarten Koornneef, Magnus Nordborg, Thomas E. Juenger, Hans de Jong and Michael E. Schranz

      Version of Record online: 13 SEP 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/tpj.13262

      Significance Statement

      Structural rearrangements redefine chromosomes, shape genome diversity and can have profound effects on selection, adaptation and spread. Here we elucidate the history of a paracentric inversion in Arabidopsis thaliana, including its origin a few thousand years ago, its maintenance under certain environmental conditions and its migration patterns, from Europe to North America and back.

  3. ORIGINAL ARTICLES

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. FEATURED ARTICLE
    4. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    5. RESOURCE
    6. TECHNICAL ADVANCE
    1. Arabidopsis miR827 mediates post-transcriptional gene silencing of its ubiquitin E3 ligase target gene in the syncytium of the cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii to enhance susceptibility (pages 179–192)

      Tarek Hewezi, Sarbottam Piya, Mingsheng Qi, Muthukumar Balasubramaniam, J. Hollis Rice and Thomas J. Baum

      Version of Record online: 26 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/tpj.13238

      Significance Statement

      Cyst nematodes engage in sophisticated and prolonged periods of biotrophic interaction with host plants; suppression of basal defenses is vital for successful parasitism, but how these nematodes suppress plant basal defenses remain largely unknown. Here we show that post-transcriptional gene silencing of an Arabidopsis ubiquitin E3 ligase gene by miR827 in nematode feeding sites inactivated basal defenses and enhanced plant susceptibility, while inactivating miR827 activity reduced plant susceptibility.

    2. IRE1, a component of the unfolded protein response signaling pathway, protects pollen development in Arabidopsis from heat stress (pages 193–204)

      Yan Deng, Renu Srivastava, Teagen D. Quilichini, Haili Dong, Yan Bao, Harry T. Horner and Stephen H. Howell

      Version of Record online: 26 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/tpj.13239

      Significance Statement

      The Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) in plants is activated by various environmental stresses during vegetative development, but is constitutively active in flowers. Here we show that a major component of the UPR signaling pathway, IRE1, a dual protein kinase/ribonuclease, protects plant reproduction, the most vulnerable stage in a plant's life cycle and that the ribonuclease function of IRE1 was critical for this protection. The ire1 mutant is male sterile at elevated temperatures because the tapetum in its anthers fails to properly deposit the pollen coat.

    3. Mutations in the N-terminal kinase-like domain of the repressor of photomorphogenesis SPA1 severely impair SPA1 function but not light responsiveness in Arabidopsis (pages 205–218)

      Xu Holtkotte, Stefan Dieterle, Leonie Kokkelink, Oliver Artz, Lisa Leson, Kirsten Fittinghoff, Ryosuke Hayama, Margaret Ahmad and Ute Hoecker

      Version of Record online: 29 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/tpj.13241

      Significance Statement

      The COP1/SPA complex is an E3 ubiquitin ligase which acts as a key repressor of photomorphogenesis in darkness. The function of the N-terminal kinase-like domain in SPA proteins is poorly understood. Here, by analyzing deletion and missense mutations of the N-terminal kinase-like domain in a spa quadruple mutant, we show that this domain is important for SPA1 activity in darkness and for the interaction with COP1, but not for the response of seedlings to light.

    4. Metabolomic prediction of yield in hybrid rice (pages 219–227)

      Shizhong Xu, Yang Xu, Liang Gong and Qifa Zhang

      Version of Record online: 29 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/tpj.13242

      Significance Statement

      Rice is a staple food source for more than 50% of the world's population and thus increasing yield can significantly contribute to global food security. However, only a small fraction of the possible hybrids have been evaluated for yield. Here we used six prediction methods and found that metabolomic prediction was consistently better than genomic prediction.

    5. 14-3-3 protein mediates plant seed oil biosynthesis through interaction with AtWRI1 (pages 228–235)

      Wei Ma, Que Kong, Jenny J. Mantyla, Yang Yang, John B. Ohlrogge and Christoph Benning

      Version of Record online: 30 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/tpj.13244

      Significance Statement

      WRINKLED 1 (WRI1), is a key transcription factor governing oil biosynthesis, but how its activity is modulated is unclear. Here we show that a 14-3-3 phosphopeptide-binding protein affects turnover and hence activity of WRI1. We hypothesize a regulatory mechanism where the binding of a 14-3-3 to WRI1 interferes with binding of an E3 ligase to WRI1, thereby protecting WRI1 from degradation. Transgenic plants overproducing a 14-3-3 displayed increased seed oil content. Thus this protein-protein interaction provides a tool set for enhancing oil content in plants.

    6. Inhibition of Arabidopsis growth by the allelopathic compound azetidine-2-carboxylate is due to the low amino acid specificity of cytosolic prolyl-tRNA synthetase (pages 236–246)

      Jiyeon Lee, Naveen Joshi, Rita Pasini, Renwick C. J. Dobson, Jane Allison and Thomas Leustek

      Version of Record online: 31 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/tpj.13246

      Significance Statement

      Azetidine-2-carboxylic acid (A2C), a L-proline analog, is a toxic allelochemical produced by certain plant species in order to defend against competing plants. Here we show that Arabidopisis, a species that does not accumulate A2C, is vulnerable to A2C toxicity due to an evolutionary “Achilles heel”; the cytosolic Prolyl-tRNA synthetase activates A2C more efficiently than the plastid synthetase does. We suggest that A2C-resistant ProRS variants could be exploited in bio-rational weed management strategies.

    7. Biosynthesis of the leucine derived α-, β- and γ-hydroxynitrile glucosides in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) (pages 247–256)

      Eva Knoch, Mohammed Saddik Motawie, Carl Erik Olsen, Birger Lindberg Møller and Michael Foged Lyngkjær

      Version of Record online: 31 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/tpj.13247

      Significance Statement

      Leucine-derived hydroxynitrile glucosides (HNGs) act as potential defense compounds. Here we identified a gene cluster encoding the enzymes needed for HNG biosynthesis, namely cytochrome P450s and UDP-glucosyltransferases, thus supporting the idea that HNG biosynthesis in barley is organized within a single multi-enzyme complex.

    8. Cuticular wax biosynthesis is positively regulated by WRINKLED4, an AP2/ERF-type transcription factor, in Arabidopsis stems (pages 257–270)

      Chan Song Park, Young Sam Go and Mi Chung Suh

      Version of Record online: 31 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/tpj.13248

      Significance Statement

      Cuticular wax levels vary greatly between plant species and between organs of the same species, but how wax biosynthesis is regulated to achieve these variations is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that the Wrinkled4 transcription factor is a key regulator that activates cuticular wax biosynthesis in Arabidopsis stems, as it binds directly to the promoters of genes encoding enzymes involved in VLCFA biosynthetic pathway.

    9. Investigating inducible short-chain alcohol dehydrogenases/reductases clarifies rice oryzalexin biosynthesis (pages 271–279)

      Naoki Kitaoka, Yisheng Wu, Jiachen Zi and Reuben J. Peters

      Version of Record online: 1 SEP 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/tpj.13249

      Significance Statement

      Rice produces labdane-related diterpenoids as phytoalexins and allelochemicals. Although their synthesis is partially elucidated, the oxidases responsible for the keto groups on such diterpenoids are largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that inducible short-chain alcohol dehydrogenases/reductases produce such keto groups.

    10. MID1 plays an important role in response to drought stress during reproductive development (pages 280–293)

      Changkui Guo, Lingya Yao, Chenjiang You, Shuangshuang Wang, Jie Cui, Xiaochun Ge and Hong Ma

      Version of Record online: 1 SEP 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/tpj.13250

      Significance Statement

      Understanding the functions of drought-responsive genes in reproductive tissues is important for improving yield under drought conditions. Here we use RNAi and overexpression lines to show that a Myb transcription factor modulates expression of drought-related and anther developmental genes in rice, thus providing molecular explanations for improved drought tolerance.

    11. AtCDC48A is involved in the turnover of an NLR immune receptor (pages 294–305)

      Charles Copeland, Virginia Woloshen, Yan Huang and Xin Li

      Version of Record online: 26 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/tpj.13251

      Significance Statement

      Nucleotide-binding Leucine rich repeat proteins (NLRs) play important roles in recognizing pathogens and initiating defense responses, but their accumulation must be tightly controlled to avoid autoimmunity. Here we show that an AAA ATPase, AtCDC48A, facilitates 26S proteasome-mediated turnover of the Suppressor of NPR1, Constitutive 1 (SNC1) immune receptor.

  4. RESOURCE

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. FEATURED ARTICLE
    4. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    5. RESOURCE
    6. TECHNICAL ADVANCE
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The LORE1 insertion mutant resource (pages 306–317)

      Anna Małolepszy, Terry Mun, Niels Sandal, Vikas Gupta, Manu Dubin, Dorian Urbański, Niraj Shah, Asger Bachmann, Eigo Fukai, Hideki Hirakawa, Satoshi Tabata, Marcin Nadzieja, Katharina Markmann, Junyi Su, Yosuke Umehara, Takashi Soyano, Akira Miyahara, Shusei Sato, Makoto Hayashi, Jens Stougaard and Stig U. Andersen

      Version of Record online: 27 SEP 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/tpj.13243

      Significance Statement

      Genome-wide insertional inactivation of genes has enabled functional genomics in increasing numbers of plant species. By activating an endogenous LTR retrotransoposon in the legume Lotus japonicus and annotating a very large number of insertion sites, nearly all active genes were targeted by activation of just a single LTR element. This was made possible due to the relaxed insertion site motif and preference for CHG-hypomethylated genes of the LTR element.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The Vigna unguiculata Gene Expression Atlas (VuGEA) from de novo assembly and quantification of RNA-seq data provides insights into seed maturation mechanisms (pages 318–327)

      Shaolun Yao, Chuan Jiang, Ziyue Huang, Ivone Torres-Jerez, Junil Chang, Heng Zhang, Michael Udvardi, Renyi Liu and Jerome Verdier

      Version of Record online: 14 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/tpj.13279

      Significance Statement

      Black-eyed peas are widely grown in semi-arid regions and have nutritious seeds, but there are limited genomics resources for this crop. To facilitate analyses, we generated a gene expression atlas, with a specific focus on pod and seed development.

  5. TECHNICAL ADVANCE

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. FEATURED ARTICLE
    4. ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    5. RESOURCE
    6. TECHNICAL ADVANCE
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The impact of mechanical compression on cortical microtubules in Arabidopsis: a quantitative pipeline (pages 328–342)

      Marion Louveaux, Sébastien Rochette, Léna Beauzamy, Arezki Boudaoud and Olivier Hamant

      Version of Record online: 17 SEP 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/tpj.13290

      Significance Statement

      Mechanical stress is known to affect diverse cellular processes, from gene expression to mitosis, but experiments are frequently qualitative and the effects of growth not considered. Here we developed a pipeline, based on microindentation and image analysis, to quantitatively investigate the impact of a precisely controlled compression on a growing plant tissue. This pipeline should help to precisely correlate the response of the cytoskeleton to mechanical stresses in living tissues.

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