Get access

Establishment of a medium-throughput approach for the genotyping of RHD variants and report of nine novel rare alleles

Authors

  • Yann Fichou,

    Corresponding author
    1. Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM), U1078, Brest, France
    2. Faculté de Médecine et des Sciences de la Santé, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest, France
    3. Laboratoire de Génétique Moléculaire et d'Histocompatibilité, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire (CHRU), Hôpital Morvan, Brest, France
    • Etablissement Français du Sang (EFS)—Bretagne, Brest, France
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Cédric Le Maréchal,

    1. Etablissement Français du Sang (EFS)—Bretagne, Brest, France
    2. Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM), U1078, Brest, France
    3. Faculté de Médecine et des Sciences de la Santé, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest, France
    4. Laboratoire de Génétique Moléculaire et d'Histocompatibilité, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire (CHRU), Hôpital Morvan, Brest, France
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Déborah Jamet,

    1. Etablissement Français du Sang (EFS)—Bretagne, Brest, France
    2. Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM), U1078, Brest, France
    3. Faculté de Médecine et des Sciences de la Santé, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest, France
    4. Laboratoire de Génétique Moléculaire et d'Histocompatibilité, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire (CHRU), Hôpital Morvan, Brest, France
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Laurence Bryckaert,

    1. Etablissement Français du Sang (EFS)—Bretagne, Brest, France
    2. Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM), U1078, Brest, France
    3. Faculté de Médecine et des Sciences de la Santé, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest, France
    4. Laboratoire de Génétique Moléculaire et d'Histocompatibilité, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire (CHRU), Hôpital Morvan, Brest, France
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Chandran Ka,

    1. Etablissement Français du Sang (EFS)—Bretagne, Brest, France
    2. Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM), U1078, Brest, France
    3. Faculté de Médecine et des Sciences de la Santé, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest, France
    4. Laboratoire de Génétique Moléculaire et d'Histocompatibilité, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire (CHRU), Hôpital Morvan, Brest, France
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Marie-Pierre Audrézet,

    1. Etablissement Français du Sang (EFS)—Bretagne, Brest, France
    2. Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM), U1078, Brest, France
    3. Faculté de Médecine et des Sciences de la Santé, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest, France
    4. Laboratoire de Génétique Moléculaire et d'Histocompatibilité, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire (CHRU), Hôpital Morvan, Brest, France
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Gérald Le Gac,

    1. Etablissement Français du Sang (EFS)—Bretagne, Brest, France
    2. Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM), U1078, Brest, France
    3. Faculté de Médecine et des Sciences de la Santé, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest, France
    4. Laboratoire de Génétique Moléculaire et d'Histocompatibilité, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire (CHRU), Hôpital Morvan, Brest, France
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Isabelle Dupont,

    1. Etablissement Français du Sang (EFS)—Bretagne, Brest, France
    2. Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM), U1078, Brest, France
    3. Faculté de Médecine et des Sciences de la Santé, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest, France
    4. Laboratoire de Génétique Moléculaire et d'Histocompatibilité, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire (CHRU), Hôpital Morvan, Brest, France
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jian-Min Chen,

    1. Etablissement Français du Sang (EFS)—Bretagne, Brest, France
    2. Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM), U1078, Brest, France
    3. Faculté de Médecine et des Sciences de la Santé, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest, France
    4. Laboratoire de Génétique Moléculaire et d'Histocompatibilité, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire (CHRU), Hôpital Morvan, Brest, France
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Claude Férec

    Corresponding author
    1. Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM), U1078, Brest, France
    2. Faculté de Médecine et des Sciences de la Santé, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest, France
    3. Laboratoire de Génétique Moléculaire et d'Histocompatibilité, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire (CHRU), Hôpital Morvan, Brest, France
    • Etablissement Français du Sang (EFS)—Bretagne, Brest, France
    Search for more papers by this author

  • Supported by the Etablissement Français du Sang (EFS)–Bretagne and the Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM), France.

Address reprint requests to: Yann Fichou, PhD, or Claude Férec, MD, PhD, Etablissement Français du Sang (EFS)–Bretagne, 46 rue Félix Le Dantec, 29218 Brest, France; e-mail: Yann.Fichou@efs.sante.fr or Claude.Ferec@univ-brest.fr.

Abstract

Background

The routinely used serologic methods are robust in accurately typing standard D− or D+ blood. However, they result in discrepancy in weak or partial D blood, which requires genetic analysis. We have previously used denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) to screen the entire RHD-coding sequence. However, DHPLC is technically challenging, labor-intensive, and time-consuming. To overcome these inconveniences, we sought to develop a new two-step approach.

Study Design and Methods

A total of 430 blood samples with D phenotype ambiguity were recruited for this study. The three most frequent weak D alleles (i.e., weak D, Type 1; weak D, Type 2; and weak D, Type 3), which altogether account for 60% to 90% of the atypical RHD alleles in the Caucasian population, were first identified by Tm-shift genotyping. The remaining unidentified samples were then subjected to a single-tube multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of all 10 RHD exons followed by direct sequencing.

Results

Optimal conditions for efficient and reliable identification of the three most common weak D variants by Tm-shift genotyping were established. All 10 RHD exons were successfully amplified in a single-multiplex PCR procedure. Employment of the two-step analysis identified RHD variants in 91.6% of the 430 studied samples. Two of the nine previously undescribed variants, c.335G>T and c.939G>A, were found to cause aberrant mRNA splicing by means of a splicing minigene assay.

Conclusion

The new two-step analysis proved to be much easier and cheaper than the DHPLC method and therefore is convenient to be used as a routine, medium-throughput approach for RHD genotyping.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary