Return behavior of occasional and multigallon blood donors: the role of theory of planned behavior, self-identity, and organizational variables

Authors

  • Anne Wevers,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department Donor Studies, Sanquin Research, Nijmegen, the Netherlands
    2. Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, the Netherlands
    • Address reprint requests to: Anne Wevers, Department Donor Studies, Sanquin Research, Geert Grooteplein Zuid 34, 6501 BA Nijmegen, The Netherlands; e-mail: a.wevers@sanquin.nl.

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  • Daniël H.J. Wigboldus,

    1. Department Donor Studies, Sanquin Research, Nijmegen, the Netherlands
    2. Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, the Netherlands
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  • Rick van Baaren,

    1. Department Donor Studies, Sanquin Research, Nijmegen, the Netherlands
    2. Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, the Netherlands
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  • Ingrid J.T. Veldhuizen

    1. Department Donor Studies, Sanquin Research, Nijmegen, the Netherlands
    2. Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, the Netherlands
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Abstract

Background

For blood establishments it is important that blood donors return for a donation. Past research has stressed the importance of theory of planned behavior (TPB) on return behavior, but self-identity (SI) and organizational variables (OVs) might play a role as well. This study added SI and OVs to the TPB to identify the determinants for return behavior.

Study Design and Methods

Whole blood donors (n = 2005) completed a questionnaire assessing TPB, SI, and OVs. OVs contained “perceived satisfaction with the blood bank” and “feeling pressure from the blood bank to donate blood.” Return behavior over the past 2 years was dichotomized as low return (0%-50%) versus high return (51%-100%). Logistic regression analyses assessed the effects of TPB, SI, and OVs on high return, separately for occasional donors (two to 10 lifetime donations) and multigallon donors (>10 lifetime donations).

Results

Results showed that, for all donors, affective attitude was positively associated with return behavior, whereas pressure to donate blood was negatively associated with return behavior. The point estimates of self-efficacy, SI, and perceived satisfaction are high for multigallon donors, but do not reach significance.

Conclusion

For all donors, positive feelings about donating blood stimulate return behavior, while experiencing a pressure to donate blood emanating from the blood bank was not beneficial. Results suggest that multigallon donors are more stimulated to return when they score higher on self-efficacy, SI, and perceived satisfaction. Interventions aiming at donor retention need to be carefully formulated to avoid negative effects of feeling pressure to donate blood.

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