Analysis of the recovery of cryopreserved and thawed CD34+ and CD3+ cells collected for hematopoietic transplantation

Authors

  • Virginia Fisher,

    1. Cell Processing Section, Department of Transfusion Medicine, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, Maryland
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  • Hanh Khuu,

    1. Cell Processing Section, Department of Transfusion Medicine, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, Maryland
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  • Virginia David-OCampo,

    1. Cell Processing Section, Department of Transfusion Medicine, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, Maryland
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  • Karen Byrne,

    1. Cell Processing Section, Department of Transfusion Medicine, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, Maryland
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  • Steven Pavletic,

    1. Experimental Transplantation and Immunology Branch, National Cancer Institute (NCI), Bethesda, Maryland
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  • Michael Bishop,

    1. Experimental Transplantation and Immunology Branch, National Cancer Institute (NCI), Bethesda, Maryland
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  • Daniel H. Fowler,

    1. Experimental Transplantation and Immunology Branch, National Cancer Institute (NCI), Bethesda, Maryland
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  • A. John Barrett,

    1. Hematology Branch, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), NIH, Bethesda, Maryland
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  • David F. Stroncek

    Corresponding author
    1. Cell Processing Section, Department of Transfusion Medicine, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, Maryland
    • Address reprint requests to: David F. Stroncek, MD, Cell Processing Section, Department of Transfusion Medicine, Clinical Center, NIH, 10 Center Drive-MSC-1184, Building 10, Room 1C711, Bethesda, MD 20892-1184; e-mail: dstroncek@cc.nih.gov.

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  • This work was supported by the Intramural Research Programs of the Clinical Center, NCI and NHLBI, NIH.

Abstract

Background

Cryopreservation is often used to store cellular therapies, but little is known about how well CD3+ or CD34+ cells tolerate this process.

Study Design and Methods

Viable CD34+ cell recoveries were analyzed from related and unrelated donor granulocyte–colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)–mobilized peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) products and viable CD3+ cell recoveries from G-CSF–mobilized and nonmobilized apheresis products from related and unrelated donors. All products were cryopreserved with 5% dimethyl sulfoxide and 6% pentastarch using a controlled-rate freezer and were stored in liquid nitrogen. Related donor products were cryopreserved immediately after collection and unrelated donor products greater than 12 hours postcollection.

Results

The postthaw recovery of CD34+ cells from related donor PBSCs was high (n = 86; 97.5 ± 23.1%) and there was no difference in postthaw CD34+ cell recovery from unrelated donor PBSCs (n = 14; 98.8 ± 37.2%; p = 0.863). In related donor lymphocyte products the postthaw CD3+ cell recovery (n = 48; 90.7 ± 21.4%) was greater than that of unrelated donor products (n = 14; 66.6 ± 35.8%; p = 0.00251). All unrelated donor lymphocyte products were from G-CSF–mobilized products, while most related donor lymphocyte products were from nonmobilized products. A comparison of the CD3+ cell recovery from related donor G-CSF–mobilized products (n = 19; 85.0 ± 29.2%) with that of unrelated donor products found no significant difference (p = 0.137).

Conclusions

The postthaw recovery of CD34+ cells was high in both related and unrelated donor products, but the recovery of CD3+ cells in unrelated donor G-CSF–mobilized products was lower. G-CSF–mobilized unrelated donor products may contain fewer CD3+ cells than non–G-CSF–exposed products upon thaw and, when indicated, cell doses should be monitored.

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