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Severe pertussis and hyperleukocytosis: is it time to change for exchange?

Authors

  • Amir Kuperman,

    1. Pediatric Hematology Clinic and Coagulation Service, Western Galilee Hospital, Naharia, Israel
    2. Faculty of Medicine in the Galilee, Bar-Ilan University, Safed, Israel
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    • These authors contributed equally.
  • Yoav Hoffmann,

    Corresponding author
    1. Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Western Galilee Hospital, Naharia, Israel
    • Address reprint requests to: Yoav Hoffmann, MD, The Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Western Gallile Hospital, Naharia 22100, Israel; e-mail: yoavhofman@gmail.com.

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    • These authors contributed equally.
  • Danny Glikman,

    1. Infectious Disease Unit, Western Galilee Hospital, Naharia, Israel
    2. Faculty of Medicine in the Galilee, Bar-Ilan University, Safed, Israel
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  • Husein Dabbah,

    1. Pediatric Pulmonology Clinic, Western Galilee Hospital, Naharia, Israel
    2. Faculty of Medicine in the Galilee, Bar-Ilan University, Safed, Israel
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  • Zeev Zonis

    1. Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Western Galilee Hospital, Naharia, Israel
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Abstract

Background

Pertussis is an important cause of infant death worldwide and continues to be a public health concern even in countries with high vaccination coverage. Severe (critical) pertussis with hyperleukocytosis is a severe form of the disease with up to 80% mortality rate. Attempts have been reported to reduce the white blood cell burden by exchange transfusion (ET) with conflicting conclusions.

Case Report

We report a case of critical pertussis in a neonate who was treated with ET, in view of a comprehensive literature review.

Results

The patient was discharged without any sequelae.

Conclusion

ET should be considered in all infants suffering from critical pertussis and hyperleukocytosis, even in secondary care community hospitals.

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