The value of area-based analyses of donation patterns for recruitment strategies

Authors


  • Supported by A 1 P01 HL 086773, Mechanisms and interventions addressing serious hazards of transfusion and cellular therapies, and a grant from the National Blood Foundation.

Abstract

Background

Lack of ready access to a donation site may be a potential barrier to or influence the frequency of blood donations. In this study, we applied geographic analysis to blood donor behavior and use of different donation sites.

Study Design and Methods

The study population consisted of blood donors who gave whole blood in Georgia between 2004 and 2008. Zip code, city, and county of donor's residence were matched with the addresses of their donation sites. Donors were dichotomized as either nonmetro Atlanta or metro Atlanta residents. Six donation site categories were defined: donation within the same or a different zip code, within the same or a different city, and within the same or a different county. Logistic regression was used to compare donations by zip code, city, and county.

Results

The study population consisted of 402,692 blood donors who donated 1,147,442 whole blood units between 2004 and 2008, more than half of whom (56.4%) resided in the metro Atlanta area. The majority of donors were white (75.0%) and female (55.7%). In nonmetro Atlanta, repeat donors were more likely to have donated at fixed sites (p < 0.001). In metro Atlanta, repeat donors were more likely to have donated at a mobile site than at a fixed site (p < 0.001).

Conclusion

Geographic and demographic differences in blood donation patterns exist. The locations of donor residences and blood donation sites influence donor behaviors. Understanding the geographic influence on donation patterns provides an important tool for optimizing donor recruitment strategies.

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