Get access

Comparison of concurrent imaging modalities for staging of dogs with appendicular primary bone tumours

Authors

  • M. L. Oblak,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Veterinary Medical Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
    • Correspondence address:

      M. L. Oblak

      Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences

      Veterinary Medical Center

      College of Veterinary Medicine

      University of Florida

      Gainesville

      FL 32611, USA

      e-mail: michelle.oblak@gmail.com

    Search for more papers by this author
  • S. E. Boston,

    1. Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Veterinary Medical Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • J. P. Woods,

    1. Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Ontario Veterinary College Health Sciences Centre, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada
    Search for more papers by this author
  • S. Nykamp

    1. Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Ontario Veterinary College Health Sciences Centre, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

This study assessed the use of whole body computed tomography (CT) for the evaluation of metastasis in dogs with primary appendicular bone tumours compared to long bone survey radiography, bone scintigraphy and thoracic radiographs. Fifteen dogs were included in this pilot study. A construct reference standard was used for detection of bone metastasis, and negative thoracic radiographs were compared against CT. Definitive lesions were only identified on bone scintigraphy. Not all lesions agreed with the construct reference standard. No definitive lesions were identified on survey radiographs or CT. Lesions were identified on thoracic CT that were not visible radiographically. Equivocal ground glass pulmonary lesions progressed in three of four cases. Whole body CT was not a suitable alternative to bone scintigraphy; however, it was useful as an adjunctive diagnostic modality. Pulmonary lesions were visible on CT that were not seen radiographically and ground glass pulmonary lesions in dogs should be considered suspicious for metastasis.

Ancillary