Peripheral blood abnormalities and bone marrow infiltration in canine large B-cell lymphoma: is there a link?

Authors

  • V. Martini,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Veterinary Sciences and Public Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Milan, Milan, Italy
    • Correspondence address:

      V. Martini, DVM

      Department of Veterinary Sciences and Public Health

      Faculty of Veterinary Medicine

      University of Milan

      via Celoria 10

      20133 Milan, Italy

      e-mail: valeria.martini@unimi.it

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  • E. Melzi,

    1. Department of Veterinary Sciences and Public Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Milan, Milan, Italy
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  • S. Comazzi,

    1. Department of Veterinary Sciences and Public Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Milan, Milan, Italy
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  • M. E. Gelain

    1. Department of Comparative Biomedicine and Food Science, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Padua, Padua, Italy
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Abstract

Official guidelines do not consider bone marrow (BM) assessment mandatory in staging canine lymphoma unless blood cytopenias are present. The aim of this study was to find out if blood abnormalities can predict marrow involvement in canine large B-cell lymphoma. BM infiltration was assessed via flow cytometry. No difference was found between dogs without haematological abnormalities and dogs with at least one. However, the degree of infiltration was significantly higher in dogs with thrombocytopenia, leucocytosis or lymphocytosis and was negatively correlated to platelet count and positively to blood infiltration. Our results suggest that blood abnormalities are not always predictive of marrow involvement, even if thrombocytopenia, leucocytosis or lymphocytosis could suggest a higher infiltration. BM evaluation should therefore be included in routine staging in order not to miss infiltrated samples and to improve classification. However, its clinical relevance and prognostic value are still not defined and further studies are needed.

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