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Inductively coupled plasma mass-spectrometric determination of platinum in excretion products of client-owned pet dogs

Authors

  • T. Janssens,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Pharmacy & Pharmacology, Slotervaart Hospital, the Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
    • Correspondence address:

      T. Janssens

      Department of Pharmacy & Pharmacology

      Slotervaart Hospital

      the Netherlands Cancer Institute

      Louwesweg 6

      1066 EC Amsterdam

      the Netherlands

      e-mail: t.janssens.correspondence@gmail.com

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  • E. E. M. Brouwers,

    1. Department of Pharmacy, Diakonessenhuis, Utrecht, the Netherlands
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  • J. P. de Vos,

    1. Veterinary Oncology Referral Centre “De Ottenhorst”, Terneuzen, the Netherlands
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  • N. de Vries,

    1. Department of Pharmacy & Pharmacology, Slotervaart Hospital, the Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
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  • J. H. M. Schellens,

    1. Department of Medical Oncology, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
    2. Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands
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  • J. H. Beijnen

    1. Department of Pharmacy & Pharmacology, Slotervaart Hospital, the Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
    2. Department of Medical Oncology, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
    3. Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands
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Abstract

Residues of antineoplastic drugs in canine excretion products may represent exposure risks to veterinary personnel, owners of pet dogs and other animal care-takers. The aim of this study was to measure the extent and duration of platinum (Pt) excretion in pet dogs treated with carboplatin. Samples were collected before and up to 21 days after administration of carboplatin. We used validated, ultra-sensitive, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry assays to measure Pt in canine urine, faeces, saliva, sebum and cerumen. Results showed that urine is the major route of elimination of Pt in dogs. In addition, excretion occurs via faeces and saliva, with the highest amounts eliminated during the first 5 days. The amount of excreted Pt decreased over time but was still quantifiable at 21 days after administration of carboplatin. In conclusion, increased Pt levels were found in all measured excretion products up to 21 days after administration of carboplatin to pet dogs, with urine as the main route of excretion. These findings may be used to further adapt current veterinary guidelines on safe handling of antineoplastic drugs and treated animals.

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