Determination of platinum surface contamination in veterinary and human oncology centres using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

Authors

  • T. Janssens,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Slotervaart Hospital/The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
    • Correspondence address:

      T. Janssens

      Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology

      Slotervaart Hospital

      Louwesweg 6

      1066 EC Amsterdam

      the Netherlands

      e-mail: t.janssens.correspondence@gmail.com

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  • E. E. M. Brouwers,

    1. Department of Pharmacy, Diakonessenhuis, Utrecht, the Netherlands
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  • J. P. de Vos,

    1. Veterinary Oncology Referral Centre “De Ottenhorst”, Terneuzen, the Netherlands
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  • N. de Vries,

    1. Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Slotervaart Hospital/The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
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  • J. H. M. Schellens,

    1. Department of Medical Oncology, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital/The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
    2. Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands
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  • J. H. Beijnen

    1. Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Slotervaart Hospital/The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
    2. Department of Medical Oncology, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital/The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
    3. Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands
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Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine the surface contamination with platinum-containing antineoplastic drugs in veterinary and human oncology centres. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to measure platinum levels in surface samples. In veterinary and human oncology centres, 46.3 and 68.9% of the sampled surfaces demonstrated platinum contamination, respectively. Highest platinum levels were found in the preparation rooms (44.6 pg cm−2) in veterinary centres, while maximal levels in human centres were found in oncology patient-only toilets (725 pg cm−2). Transference of platinum by workers outside areas where antineoplastic drugs were handled was observed in veterinary and human oncology centres. In conclusion, only low levels of platinum contamination attributable to carboplatin were found in the sampled veterinary oncology centres. However, dispersion of platinum outside areas where antineoplastic drugs were handled was detected in veterinary and human oncology centres. Consequently, not only personnel, but also others may be exposed to platinum.

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