Vinorelbine rescue therapy for dogs with primary urinary bladder carcinoma

Authors

  • M. E. Kaye,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Small Animal Medicine & Surgery, University of Georgia, College of Veterinary Medicine, Athens, GA, USA
    • Correspondence address:

      J. Lawrence

      Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies

      University of Edinburgh

      Easter Bush Campus

      Midlothian EH25 9RG, UK

      e-mail: lawrence@uga.edu

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  • D. H. Thamm,

    1. The Animal Cancer Center, Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Colorado State University, Collins, CO, USA
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  • K. Weishaar,

    1. The Animal Cancer Center, Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Colorado State University, Collins, CO, USA
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  • J. A. Lawrence

    1. Department of Small Animal Medicine & Surgery, University of Georgia, College of Veterinary Medicine, Athens, GA, USA
    2. Current address: Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, University of Edinburgh, Easter Bush Campus, Midlothian EH25 9RG, UK
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Abstract

The goal of this study was to evaluate the anti-tumour activity and toxicoses of vinorelbine as a palliative rescue therapy for dogs with primary urinary bladder carcinoma. Thirteen dogs refractory to prior chemotherapeutics and one dog naïve to chemotherapeutic treatment were enrolled. Vinorelbine (15 mg m−2 IV) was administered intravenously along with concurrent oral anti-inflammatory drugs, if tolerated. A median of six doses of vinorelbine (range: 1–16) was administered. Two dogs (14%) had partial responses, and eight (57%) experienced stable disease. Subjective improvement in clinical signs was noted in 11 dogs (78%). Adverse events were mild and primarily haematological in nature. Median time to progression was 93 days (range: 20–239 days). Median survival time for all dogs was 187 days; median survival for 13 pre-treated dogs was 207 days. Vinorelbine may have utility in the management of canine primary urinary bladder carcinoma and should be evaluated in a prospective study.

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