Association between excess body weight and urine protein concentration in healthy dogs

Authors

  • Karen M. Tefft,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Companion Animals, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PEI, Canada
    • Correspondence

      K. M. Tefft, Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, The Ohio State University Veterinary Medical Center, 601 Vernon L. Tharp Street, Columbus, OH 43210, USA

      E-mail: tefft.7@osu.edu

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  • Darcy H. Shaw,

    1. Department of Companion Animals, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PEI, Canada
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  • Sherri L. Ihle,

    1. Department of Companion Animals, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PEI, Canada
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  • Shelley A. Burton,

    1. Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PEI, Canada
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  • LeeAnn Pack

    1. Department of Companion Animals, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PEI, Canada
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Abstract

Background

Markedly overweight people can develop progressive proteinuria and kidney failure secondary to obesity-related glomerulopathy (ORG). Glomerular lesions in dogs with experimentally induced obesity are similar to those in people with ORG.

Objectives

The aim of this study was to evaluate if urine protein and albumin excretion is greater in overweight and obese dogs than in dogs of ideal body condition.

Methods

Client-owned dogs were screened for underlying health conditions. These dogs were assigned a body condition score (BCS) using a 9-point scoring system. Dogs with a BCS of ≥ 6 were classified as being overweight/obese, and dogs with a BCS of 4 or 5 were classified as being of ideal body weight. The urine protein:creatinine ratio (UPC) and urine albumin:creatinine ratio (UAC) were then determined, and compared between 20 overweight/obese dogs and 22 ideal body weight control dogs.

Results

Median UPC (0.04 [range, 0.01–0.14; interquartile range, 0.07]) and UAC (0.41 [0–10.39; 3.21]) of overweight/obese dogs were not significantly different from median UPC (0.04 [0.01–0.32; 0.07]) and UAC (0.18 [0–7.04; 1.75]) in ideal body weight dogs.

Conclusions

Clinicopathologic abnormalities consistent with ORG were absent from overweight/obese dogs in this study.

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