Veterinary Dermatology

Cover image for Vol. 24 Issue 5

October 2013

Volume 24, Issue 5

Pages 477–559

  1. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Scientific Papers
    4. Brief Communications
    5. Case Reports
    6. Letters to the Editor
    7. Book Review
  2. Scientific Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Scientific Papers
    4. Brief Communications
    5. Case Reports
    6. Letters to the Editor
    7. Book Review
    1. Hypersensitivity disorders

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      Efficacy and safety of oclacitinib for the control of pruritus and associated skin lesions in dogs with canine allergic dermatitis (pages 479–e114)

      Sallie B. Cosgrove, Jody A. Wren, Dawn M. Cleaver, David D. Martin, Kelly F. Walsh, Jessica A. Harfst, Stacey L. Follis, Vickie L. King, Joseph F. Boucher and Michael R. Stegemann

      Version of Record online: 5 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12047

    2. A pilot study of the validation of percutaneous testing in cats (pages 488–e115)

      Michael A. Rossi, Linda Messinger, Thierry Olivry and Raweewan Hoontrakoon

      Version of Record online: 5 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12054

    3. The effect of ‘allergenic’ and ‘nonallergenic’ antibiotics on dog keratinocyte viability in vitro (pages 501–e119)

      Katrine L. Voie, Benjamin E. Lucas, David Schaeffer, Dewey Kim, Karen L. Campbell and Sidonie N. Lavergne

      Version of Record online: 11 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12060

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      Background – Immune-mediated adverse drug reactions (drug hypersensitivity) are relatively common in veterinary medicine, but their pathogenesis is not well understood. For an unknown reason, delayed drug hypersensitivity often targets the skin. Antibiotics, especially β-lactams and sulfonamides, are commonly associated with these adverse events. The ‘danger theory’ hypothesizes that ‘danger’ signals, such as drug-induced cell death, might be part of the pathogenesis of drug hypersensitivity reactions. Hypothesis/Objectives – The goal of this study was to determine whether antibiotics that are commonly associated with cutaneous drug hypersensitivity (allergenic) decrease canine keratinocyte viability in vitro more than antibiotics that rarely cause such reactions (nonallergenic). Conclusion – It appears that the effect of drugs on the in vitro viability of dog keratinocytes is not a good predictor of the ‘allergenic’ potential of an antibiotic. Further work is required to investigate other drug-induced ‘danger’ signals in dog keratinocytes exposed to ‘allergenic’ antibiotics in vitro.

    4. Miscellaneous alopecias

      Study of the behaviour of lesional and nonlesional skin of canine recurrent flank alopecia transplanted to athymic nude mice (pages 507–e120)

      Sophie I. Vandenabeele, Hilde DeCock, Luc Van Ham, Evelyne Meyer and Sylvie Daminet

      Version of Record online: 19 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12059

    5. Diseases of eyelids, claws, anal sacs and ears

    6. Equine

      Evaluation of the affinity of various species and strains of Staphylococcus to adhere to equine corneocytes (pages 525–e124)

      Heather D. Akridge, Shelley C. Rankin, Gregory C. Griffeth, Raymond C. Boston, Nancy E. Callori and Daniel O. Morris

      Version of Record online: 2 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12061

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      Background – Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strain USA 500 predominately colonizes horses and people working with them. Previous studies demonstrate that some Staphylococcus species exhibit higher affinity for corneocytes of specific mammalian species. Hypothesis/Objectives – The objective was to determine the relative affinities of various MRSA strains, meticillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) strains and a meticillin-susceptible Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MSSP) for equine corneocytes. We hypothesized that MRSA strain USA 500 would exhibit greater adhesion than other staphylococcal strains tested. Conclusions and clinical importance – Meticillin-resistant S. aureus strain USA 500 did not adhere more robustly than other strains of Staphylococcus; therefore, its affinity to colonize horses may not be solely attributed to corneocyte adhesion. Additional studies are required to explain the epidemiological role of this strain as the predominant cause of colonization and infections of horses in North America.

  3. Brief Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Scientific Papers
    4. Brief Communications
    5. Case Reports
    6. Letters to the Editor
    7. Book Review
    1. Feline trombiculosis: a retrospective study in 72 cats (pages 535–e126)

      Federico Leone, Andrea Di Bella, Antonella Vercelli and Luisa Cornegliani

      Version of Record online: 5 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12053

    2. Whole-genome comparison of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus CC22 SCCmecIV from people and their in-contact pets (pages 538–e128)

      Anette Loeffler, Alex McCarthy, David H. Lloyd, Eva Musilová, Dirk U. Pfeiffer and Jodi A. Lindsay

      Version of Record online: 19 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12062

  4. Case Reports

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Scientific Papers
    4. Brief Communications
    5. Case Reports
    6. Letters to the Editor
    7. Book Review
    1. Nonuraemic nonfatal idiopathic calciphylaxis in a kitten (pages 547–e131)

      Nina Thom, Elif Er and Manfred Reinacher

      Version of Record online: 9 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12064

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      Background -- Calciphylaxis is a rare cutaneous disorder, characterized by vascular calcification and progressive skin necrosis, not yet described in cats. It is scarcely reported in animals, mostly due to iatrogenic or uraemic disturbances of the calcium–phosphate balance. In human patients, it is most commonly seen with end-stage renal disease, but several nonuraemic disorders, including inherited dysfunctions of tissue calcification inhibitors, have also been described. Hypothesis / Objectives -- To describe a case of nonuraemic calciphylaxis in a cat. Conclusions and clinical importance -- Calciphylaxis should be considered as a differential diagnosis for ulcerative cutaneous disorders in young cats. More information on this disease is needed to elucidate the pathomechanism.

    2. Canine pyoderma gangrenosum: a case series of two dogs (pages 552–e132)

      Deborah L. Simpson, Gregory G. Burton and Lydia E. Hambrook

      Version of Record online: 9 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12065

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      Background – Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a rare disease, which, to the best of the authors' knowledge, has been the subject of only one case report in the peer-reviewed veterinary literature. Hypothesis/Objectives – To describe the history, clinical signs, diagnostic findings and treatment outcome in two cases of canine PG. Conclusions and clinical importance – Pyoderma gangrenosum is a rare disease distinguished by rapid progression of painful, necrolytic, cutaneous ulcers with irregular, violaceous undermined borders. Azathioprine with glucocorticoids may lead to a better outcome than ciclosporin and glucocorticoids (currently the first-line treatment in humans and the only reported treatment in dogs).

  5. Letters to the Editor

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Scientific Papers
    4. Brief Communications
    5. Case Reports
    6. Letters to the Editor
    7. Book Review
    1. Pour-on alphacypermethrin is an effective treatment for natural Werneckiella equi infection in donkeys (Equus asinus) (pages 556–557)

      Vincenzo Veneziano, Antonio Di Loria, Orlando Paciello, Giuseppe Borzacchiello, Davide de Biase, Jacopo Guccione, Diego Piantedosi and Domenico Santoro

      Version of Record online: 5 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12051

  6. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Scientific Papers
    4. Brief Communications
    5. Case Reports
    6. Letters to the Editor
    7. Book Review
    1. Muller & Kirk's Small Animal Dermatology (page 559)

      Adri van den Broek

      Version of Record online: 15 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12055

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