Veterinary Dermatology

Cover image for Vol. 24 Issue 6

December 2013

Volume 24, Issue 6

Pages 561–650

  1. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Review
    3. Scientific Papers
    4. Brief Communications
    5. Case Reports
    6. Book Review
    1. Bacterial skin diseases

      Feline cutaneous mycobacteriosis: a review of clinical, pathological and molecular characterization of one case of Mycobacterium microti skin infection and nine cases of feline leprosy syndrome from France and New Caledonia (pages 561–e134)

      Caroline Laprie, Julie Duboy, Richard Malik and Janet Fyfe

      Article first published online: 2 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12066

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      Background – Ten cats with skin lesions characteristic of cutaneous mycobacteriosis were included in this retrospective clinical, pathological and molecular study. Hypothesis/Objectives – The aim of this study was to identify the causative agent and to compare the clinicopathological features of these cases with those of previous studies. Conclusions and clinical importance – Based on this geographically restricted case series, feline leprosy in southern France is most likely to be caused by M. lepraemurium and presents as a generally self-limiting disease. Molecular testing is essential to assess zoonotic potential, because M. microti-induced cutaneous mycobacteriosis can resemble feline leprosy syndrome.

  2. Scientific Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Review
    3. Scientific Papers
    4. Brief Communications
    5. Case Reports
    6. Book Review
    1. Bacterial skin diseases

    2. Hypersensitivity disorders

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      A blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of the efficacy and safety of the Janus kinase inhibitor oclacitinib (Apoquel®) in client-owned dogs with atopic dermatitis (pages 587–e142)

      Sallie B. Cosgrove, Jody A. Wren, Dawn M. Cleaver, Kelly F. Walsh, Stacey I. Follis, Vickie I. King, Jezaniah-Kira S. Tena and Michael R. Stegemann

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12088

    4. Autoimmune and immune-mediated dermatoses

      You have free access to this content
    5. Miscellaneous alopecias

      Evaluation of hair loss in cats occurring after treatment with a topical flea control product (pages 602–e146)

      Kelly M. Credille, Lori A. Thompson, Lisa M. Young, Jeffery A. Meyer and Joseph R. Winkle

      Article first published online: 20 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12075

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      Background – A formulation containing 39.6% spinetoram resulted in a higher than anticipated number of reports of alopecia at the site of application in the first months following commercial product launch. Hypothesis/Objectives – To determine the cause of the alopecia using histopathology, including assessment for inflammation, follicular findings of physical trauma (plucking/pulling behaviour) and changes in follicular cycling. Conclusions and clinical importance – Microscopic changes in the hair follicles of affected cats were consistent with self-induced trauma or barbering behaviour. All changes were reversible and paralleled findings associated with well-established, topical flea control products.

    6. Neoplastic and non-neoplastic tumors

      Clinical outcome and cyclo-oxygenase-2 expression in five dogs with solar dermatitis/actinic keratosis treated with firocoxib (pages 606–e147)

      Francesco Albanese, Francesca Abramo, Chiara Caporali, Gaia Vichi and Francesca Millanta

      Article first published online: 15 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12082

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      Background – The conversion of arachidonic acid into prostaglandin is catalysed by the cyclo-oxygenases (COX-1/COX-2). Several studies indicate that COX-2 is overexpressed in actinic keratosis in humans and dogs. Firocoxib is a COX-2-selective inhibitor that blocks the biochemical activity of COX-2. Hypothesis/Objectives – To evaluate the efficacy of firocoxib (5 mg/kg orally once daily) for the treatment of dogs with solar dermatitis/actinic keratosis. Conclusions and clinical importance – A role for COX-2 might thus be hypothesized in the pathogenesis of canine solar dermatitis.

    7. Dermatoses of exotic small mammals

      Skin diseases in pet rabbits: a retrospective study of 334 cases seen at the University of California at Davis, USA (1984–2004) (pages 613–e148)

      Tara S. Snook, Stephen D. White, Michelle G. Hawkins, Lisa A. Tell, Laura S. Wilson, Catherine A. Outerbridge and Peter J. Ihrke

      Article first published online: 24 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12087

  3. Brief Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Review
    3. Scientific Papers
    4. Brief Communications
    5. Case Reports
    6. Book Review
    1. Treatment of shelter cats with oral terbinafine and concurrent lime sulphur rinses (pages 618–e150)

      Karen Moriello, Kimberly Coyner, Ann Trimmer, Sandra Newbury and Darcie Kunder

      Article first published online: 23 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12069

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      Background – Dermatophytosis is an important contagious and infectious skin disease in an animal shelter. Itraconazole is the commonly used systemic antifungal drug, but it is expensive in some countries and, at times, difficult to obtain. Terbinafine is a fungicidal allylamine with documented in vitro and in vivo efficacy against Microsporum canis in pet cats and in cats with experimental infections. Hypothesis/Objectives – To describe the use of oral terbinafine for the treatment of M. canis dermatophytosis in shelter cats. Clinical significance – Where itraconazole is not available, substitution with terbinafine in established protocols may allow shelters to treat cats that otherwise would go untreated.

    2. Treatment of alopecia X with medroxyprogesterone acetate (pages 624–e154)

      Linda A. Frank and Jacqueline B. Watson

      Article first published online: 2 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12073

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      Background – Alopecia X is a common cause of noninflammatory alopecia in Pomeranian dogs. In the past, treatment with growth hormone injections resulted in hair regrowth in many individuals. Progesterone can induce mammary-derived growth hormone and is used to treat dogs with congenital growth hormone deficiency. Hypothesis/Objectives – To determine whether progesterone induces endogenous insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and causes hair regrowth in dogs with alopecia X. Conclusions and clinical importance – Results of this study showed that medroxyprogesterone injections resulted in partial hair regrowth in three and complete hair regrowth in one of eight Pomeranian dogs with alopecia X.

    3. Transcription profile of chemokine receptors, cytokines and cytotoxic markers in peripheral blood of dogs with epitheliotropic cutaneous lymphoma (pages 628–e155)

      Naoki Chimura, Aki Iio, Eiji Ozaki, Takashi Mori, Yusuke Ito, Nobuo Murayama, Masahiko Nagata, Kaori Ide, Koji Nishifuji, Hiroaki Kamishina and Sadatoshi Maeda

      Article first published online: 9 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12076

  4. Case Reports

    1. Top of page
    2. Review
    3. Scientific Papers
    4. Brief Communications
    5. Case Reports
    6. Book Review
    1. A case in Europe of feline histoplasmosis apparently limited to the skin (pages 635–e158)

      Nina M. Fischer, Claude Favrot, Michel Monod, Paula Grest, Katia Rech and Sylvia Wilhelm

      Article first published online: 9 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12077

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      Background – Histoplasma capsulatum has a worldwide distribution, but reports in Europe remain rare. We present the second report of histoplasmosis in a cat in Europe and, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of feline histoplasmosis infection apparently limited to the skin. Conclusions and clinical importance – Histoplasmosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of nodular diseases of cats worldwide.

    2. A case of vesicular cutaneous lupus erythematosus in a Border collie successfully treated with topical tacrolimus and nicotinamide–tetracycline (pages 639–e160)

      Georg M. Lehner and Monika Linek

      Article first published online: 11 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12078

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      Background – Canine vesicular cutaneous lupus erythematosus (VCLE) is an autoimmune skin disease of the Shetland sheepdog and rough collie, which manifests as an erosive dermatitis of sparsely haired skin of the ventrum and concave pinnae. Reported treatment consists of immunosuppression with glucocorticoids alone or in combination with azathioprine, but successful treatment is unpredictable. Hypothesis/Objectives – To report on the treatment of VCLE in a Border collie dog with topical 0.1% tacrolimus and nicotinamide in combination with tetracycline. Conclusion and clinical importance – This dog responded well to treatment with topical 0.1% tacrolimus, nicotinamide–tetracycline and sun avoidance. Complete remission was achieved after 2.5 months, and the dog was lesion free during a 1 year follow-up period.

    3. Papillomavirus-associated multicentric squamous cell carcinoma in situ in a cat: an unusually extensive and progressive case with subsequent metastasis (pages 642–e162)

      Philippa A. Ravens, Linda J. Vogelnest, Lydia J. Tong, Lauren E. Demos and Mark D. Bennett

      Article first published online: 11 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12080

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      Background – Multicentric squamous cell carcinoma in situ (MSCCIS) is an uncommon cutaneous disease of middle-aged to older cats, with some cases being linked to papillomavirus infection. The disease course is usually benign. Initial eruption of multifocal, pigmented, hyperkeratotic plaques is typical, with gradual progression to thickly crusted ulcerative lesions. Conclusions – This case represents an unusual presentation of papillomavirus-associated MSCCIS with extensive lesions, atypical initial histopathology and progression to SCC with distant metastases.

    4. Putative paraneoplastic pemphigus and myasthenia gravis in a cat with a lymphocytic thymoma (pages 646–e164)

      Peter B. Hill, Phil Brain, David Collins, Steve Fearnside and Thierry Olivry

      Article first published online: 28 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12086

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      Background – Paraneoplastic pemphigus (PNP) is a rare and severe autoimmune blistering skin disease of humans. It is associated mainly with haematopoietic neoplasia and a unique autoantibody profile. At this time and in animals, PNP has only been reported in dogs. Objectives – To report clinical, histological and immunological findings in a cat with suspected thymoma-associated PNP. Conclusions and clinical importance – In this cat, clinical, microscopic and immunological findings were consistent with a diagnosis of PNP, with thymoma being the suspected cause.

  5. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Review
    3. Scientific Papers
    4. Brief Communications
    5. Case Reports
    6. Book Review

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