Veterinary Dermatology

Cover image for Vol. 25 Issue 2

April 2014

Volume 25, Issue 2

Pages 61–148

  1. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Review
    3. Scientific Papers
    4. Brief Communications
    5. Case Report
    6. Letters to the Editor
    1. Cutaneous involvement in canine leishmaniosis due to Leishmania infantum (syn. L. chagasi) (pages 61–e22)

      Manolis N. Saridomichelakis and Alexander F. Koutinas

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12105

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      Background – Canine leishmaniosis, a zoonotic infectious disease caused by Leishmania infantum (syn. L. chagasi), is fairly common in endemic areas, and skin lesions are the most frequent clinical manifestation. Despite the large volume of relevant scientific information, there is a relative paucity of up-to-date review articles on the cutaneous manifestations of the disease. Hypothesis/Objectives – This review provides current information on the macroscopic and histological skin lesions of dogs with leishmaniosis and comments on their pathogenesis and definitive diagnosis. Conclusions and clinical importance – Canine leishmaniosis due to L. infantum is characterized by diverse cutaneous manifestations that may reflect different host–parasite relationships. Furthermore, different types of skin lesions may occur, in various combinations, in the same dog. The definitive diagnosis of these lesions is based on clinical and laboratory examinations and on the response to antileishmanial treatment.

  2. Scientific Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Review
    3. Scientific Papers
    4. Brief Communications
    5. Case Report
    6. Letters to the Editor
    1. Parasitic skin diseases

      Canine demodicosis: the relationship between response to treatment of generalised disease and markers for inflammation and oxidative status (pages 72–e24)

      Silvia Martínez-Subiela, Luis J. Bernal, Asta Tvarijonaviciute, Juan D. Garcia-Martinez, Fernando Tecles and Jose J. Cerón

      Article first published online: 15 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12108

    2. Hypersensitivity disorders

      Validation of the Canine Atopic Dermatitis Extent and Severity Index (CADESI)-4, a simplified severity scale for assessing skin lesions of atopic dermatitis in dogs (pages 77–e25)

      Thierry Olivry, Manolis Saridomichelakis, Tim Nuttall, Emmanuel Bensignor, Craig E. Griffin and Peter B. Hill, for the International Committee on Allergic Diseases of Animals (ICADA)

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12107

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      Background – Severity scales are used to grade skin lesions in clinical trials for treatment of dogs with atopic dermatitis (AD). At this time, only two scales have been validated, namely the Canine Atopic Dermatitis Extent and Severity Index (CADESI)-3 and the Canine Atopic Dermatitis Lesion Index (CADLI). However, the high number of assessed sites makes the CADESI-3 impractical. Hypothesis/Objectives – The aim of this study was to develop and validate a fourth version of the CADESI that is simpler and quicker to administer. Conclusions and clinical importance – The CADESI-4 is simpler to use and quicker to administer than its previous version. The ICADA recommends the CADESI-4 instead of the CADESI-3 to score skin lesions of AD in dogs enrolled in clinical trials.

    3. Feline eosinophilic dermatoses: a retrospective immunohistochemical and ultrastructural study of extracellular matrix remodelling (pages 86–e26)

      Ilaria Porcellato, Andrea Giontella, Luca Mechelli, Emilia Del Rossi and Chiara Brachelente

      Article first published online: 26 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12119

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      Background – Feline eosinophilic dermatoses (FEDs) are common diseases of cats with an unknown pathogenesis. They are histologically characterized by an eosinophilic infiltration and often by the presence of flame figures (FFs) and/or areas of loss of tissue architecture, here termed necrotic foci (NF). It has been postulated that an alteration in the degradation of the extracellular matrix could be responsible for these histological features. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a group of proteases that are fundamental in extracellular matrix remodelling. Hypothesis/Objectives – The aim of the study was to investigate retrospectively the expression of a subgroup of MMPs, in particular MMP-2 and MMP-9 gelatinases, in FEDs. The expression of one of their inhibitors, TIMP-2, was also investigated in order to establish the role of these molecules in the pathogenesis of FEDs. The ultrastructural characteristics of extracellular matrix in FFs and NF were subsequently assessed. Conclusions and clinical Importance – Our study suggests that an imbalance in the expression of matrix metalloproteinases could be responsible for different morphological findings in FEDs. Further studies are needed to assess the role of matrix metalloproteinases in the pathogenesis of FEDs.

    4. Auto-immune and immune-mediated dermatoses

      Fipronil–amitraz–S-methoprene-triggered pemphigus foliaceus in 21 dogs: clinical, histological and immunological characteristics (pages 103–e30)

      Petra Bizikova, Keith E. Linder and Thierry Olivry

      Article first published online: 26 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12117

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      Background – A recently launched topical ectoparasiticide containing fipronil, amitraz and S-methoprene has been associated with the development of an acantholytic pustular dermatitis similar to that of Promeris-triggered pemphigus foliaceus (PF). Hypothesis/Objectives – Our objectives were to describe the clinical, histological and immunological features of this PF-like cutaneous adverse drug reaction. Conclusions and clinical importance – This new topical ectoparasiticide containing fipronil, amitraz and S-methoprene is capable of triggering the development of an acantholytic pustular dermatosis that is a clinical, histological and immunological close match for Promeris-triggered PF and naturally occurring autoimmune PF in dogs.

    5. Congenital and hereditary defects

      Clinical and histological characterization of multifocal, spontaneous, noninfectious alopecia in Norwegian puffin dogs (lundehunds) (pages 112–e32)

      Kerstin E. Bergvall and Arman Shokrai

      Article first published online: 26 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12111

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      Background – A noninfectious, spontaneous, multifocal alopecia has been recognized in Norwegian puffin dogs. Hypothesis/Objectives – This study aimed to report demographic information, history, clinical signs, histopathological features and follow-up information for alopecic Norwegian puffin dogs from Sweden. Conclusions and clinical importance – This is the first report of mural, mucinotic, isthmus folliculitis alopecia in Norwegian puffin dogs.

    6. Diseases of eyelids, claws, anal sacs and ears

    7. Equine

  3. Brief Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Review
    3. Scientific Papers
    4. Brief Communications
    5. Case Report
    6. Letters to the Editor
    1. Prevalence of fur mites (Chirodiscoides caviae) in pet guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus) in southern Italy (pages 135–e38)

      Dario d'Ovidio and Domenico Santoro

      Article first published online: 29 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12110

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      Background – Chirodiscoides caviae is the most common fur mite affecting guinea pigs; infestation is generally asymptomatic. No studies have been published on the prevalence of such mites in guinea pigs in southern Italy. Hypothesis/Objectives – We sought to evaluate the prevalence and the clinical signs of C. caviae infestation in guinea pigs in southern Italy. Conclusions and clinical importance – The results of this study indicate a high prevalence of C. caviae infestation in guinea pigs in southern Italy. Chirodiscoides mites should be sought in guinea pigs, particularly in animals coming from pet shops.

    2. On the role of survivin as a stem cell biomarker of canine hair follicle and related tumours (pages 138–e40)

      Laura Bongiovanni, Francesca Di Diodoro, Leonardo Della Salda and Chiara Brachelente

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12114

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      Background – Survivin has been identified as one of the most cancer-specific molecules, with a dual function of apoptosis inhibitor and orchestrator of cell division. Hypothesis/Objectives – Based on our recent results obtained during the study of the role of survivin in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, we investigate its potential role in maintenance of stemness in both the normal canine hair follicle and related tumours. Conclusions and clinical importance – These findings suggest that survivin could play an important role in the maintenance of the hair follicle cycle as well as in tumour initiation and maintenance of cancer stem cells.

      Corrected by:

      Addendum: Addendum

      Vol. 25, Issue 5, 491, Article first published online: 31 AUG 2014

  4. Case Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Review
    3. Scientific Papers
    4. Brief Communications
    5. Case Report
    6. Letters to the Editor
    1. Evaluation of anti-Müllerian hormone in a dog with a Sertoli cell tumour (pages 142–e41)

      Hitoshi Ano, Yuichi Hidaka and Hiromu Katamoto

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12112

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      Background ---Testicular tumours are common in elderly male dogs, and Sertoli cell tumours (SCTs) are among the most common. An increase in blood estradiol concentration is often seen in canine SCTs, but such measurements do not necessarily correlate with the clinical signs. Conclusions and clinical importance --- Canine serum AMH concentrations, as measured by a human AMH enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, may be useful as a marker for canine SCT.

  5. Letters to the Editor

    1. Top of page
    2. Review
    3. Scientific Papers
    4. Brief Communications
    5. Case Report
    6. Letters to the Editor
    1. mecC- and mecA-positive meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolated from livestock sharing habitat with wildlife previously tested positive for mecC-positive MRSA (pages 147–148)

      Igor Loncaric, Anna Kübber-Heiss, Annika Posautz, Gabrielle L. Stalder, Daniel Hoffmann, Renate Rosengarten and Chris Walzer

      Article first published online: 26 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12116

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