Veterinary Dermatology

Cover image for Vol. 25 Issue 3

June 2014

Volume 25, Issue 3

Pages 145–234

  1. Abstracts

    1. Top of page
    2. Abstracts
    3. Review
    4. Scientific Papers
    5. Case Reports
    6. Letter to the Editor
    1. You have free access to this content
  2. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Abstracts
    3. Review
    4. Scientific Papers
    5. Case Reports
    6. Letter to the Editor
    1. You have free access to this content
      Guidelines for the diagnosis and antimicrobial therapy of canine superficial bacterial folliculitis (Antimicrobial Guidelines Working Group of the International Society for Companion Animal Infectious Diseases) (pages 163–e43)

      Andrew Hillier, David H. Lloyd, J. Scott Weese, Joseph M. Blondeau, Dawn Boothe, Edward Breitschwerdt, Luca Guardabassi, Mark G. Papich, Shelley Rankin, John D. Turnidge and Jane E. Sykes

      Version of Record online: 10 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12118

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      Background – Superficial bacterial folliculitis (SBF) is usually caused by Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and routinely treated with systemic antimicrobial agents. Infection is a consequence of reduced immunity associated with alterations of the skin barrier and underlying diseases that may be difficult to diagnose and resolve; thus, SBF is frequently recurrent and repeated treatment is necessary. The emergence of multiresistant bacteria, particularly meticillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius (MRSP), has focused attention on the need for optimal management of SBF. Objectives – Provision of an internationally available resource guiding practitioners in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of SBF. Conclusions and clinical importance – Optimal management of SBF will improve antimicrobial use and reduce selection of MRSP and other multidrug-resistant bacteria affecting animal and human health.

  3. Scientific Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Abstracts
    3. Review
    4. Scientific Papers
    5. Case Reports
    6. Letter to the Editor
    1. Structure & function of the skin

      High-frequency ultrasound biomicroscopy of the normal canine haired skin (pages 176–e45)

      Panagiotis Mantis, Dimitrios Tontis, David Church, David Lloyd, Kim Stevens, Dimitrios Balomenos, Pagona G. Gouletsou, Giorgos Gianoulopoulos, Dimitrios Doukas, Apostolos D. Galatos and Manolis Saridomichelakis

      Version of Record online: 12 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12120

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      Background – The ultrasonographic appearance of the normal canine haired skin examined using high-frequency ultrasonography has not been described. Hyposthesis/Objectives – To describe the echogenicity of normal canine haired skin using high-frequency (50 MHz) ultrasonography and to compare ultrasonographic with histological measurements of skin thickness using snap-frozen tissue biopsy samples. Conclusions and clinical importance – Cutaneous ultrasound biomicroscopy using a 50 MHz transducer is a useful tool for the following applications: (i) to identify the skin layers (including the epidermis, dermis and subcutaneous fat); (ii) to demonstrate the hair follicles in various areas of the haired skin; and (iii) to measure the thickness of normal canine skin accurately.

    2. Bacterial skin diseases

      Minocycline pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in dogs: dosage recommendations for treatment of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius infections (pages 182–e47)

      Marit G. Maaland, Luca Guardabassi and Mark G. Papich

      Version of Record online: 20 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12130

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      Background- Although minocycline is not licensed for use in dogs, this tetracycline has therapeutic potential against meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius. Hypothesis/Objectives- The aim of this study was to establish rational dosage recommendations for minocycline use in dogs. Specific objectives were to generate and analyse minocycline pharmacokinetic (PK) data on plasma and interstitial fluid (ISF) concentrations, plasma protein binding and pharmacodynamic (PD) data on antimicrobial activity against S. pseudintermedius. Conclusions and clinical importance- Besides dosage recommendations for therapy of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius infections in dogs, the study also provides PK/PD data necessary to establish species-specific clinical breakpoints for minocycline susceptibility testing.

    3. Fungal and Algal skin diseases

    4. Parasitic skin disease

      You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
    5. Hypersensitivity disorders

      Preferential gene transcription of T helper 2 cytokines in peripheral CCR4+CD4+ lymphocytes in dogs (pages 199–e50)

      Aki Iio, Tsutomu Motohashi, Takahiro Kunisada, Yuma Yasuhira, Hiroaki Kamishina and Sadatoshi Maeda

      Version of Record online: 20 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12125

    6. Perianal pruritus in dogs with skin disease (pages 204–e52)

      Elisa Maina, Mario Galzerano and Chiara Noli

      Version of Record online: 5 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12127

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      Background- Perianal pruritus has been reported in dogs with anal sac disease but not in healthy dogs. Some authors describe it as typical of allergy, but there is little evidence in support of this. Hypothesis/Objectives- The aim was to investigate the association between perianal pruritus and canine atopic dermatitis (CAD), adverse food reaction (ARF) and other skin diseases in dogs. Conclusions and clinical importance- Perianal pruritus was seen more frequently in dogs with AFR/CAD than with other dermatological diseases. This is the first study to evaluate perianal pruritus in dogs with skin disease and without anal sac disease.

    7. Equine

      Serum antibodies and DNA indicate a high prevalence of equine papillomavirus 2 (EcPV2) among horses in Switzerland (pages 210–e54)

      Nina. M. Fischer, Claude Favrot, Katharina Birkmann, Michele Jackson, Colin C. Schwarzwald, Martin Müller, Kurt Tobler, Marco Geisseler and Christian E. Lange

      Version of Record online: 20 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12129

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      Background – The DNA of equine papillomavirus type 2 (EcPV2) is consistently found in equine papillomas and squamous cell carcinomas, indicating a causal association of EcPV2 in the pathogenesis of these tumours; however, little is known about the prevalence of this virus. Hypothesis/Objectives – The aim of this study was to determine the geno- and seroprevalence of EcPV2 in clinically healthy horses in Switzerland. Conclusions and clinical importance – The seroprevalence suggests that EcPV2 is prevalent in the Swiss equine population, while the genoprevalence indicates that currently ongoing infections are less common. The discrepancy between geno- and seroprevalence probably indicates different stages of infection in the tested cohort.

    8. Sheep

      Isolation of bacterial skin flora of healthy sheep, with comparison between frequent and minimal human handling (pages 215–e56)

      Amy C. Haarstad, Melissa C. Eisenschenk, Nicole A. Heinrich, J. Scott Weese and Patrick J. McKeever

      Version of Record online: 20 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12126

  4. Case Reports

    1. Top of page
    2. Abstracts
    3. Review
    4. Scientific Papers
    5. Case Reports
    6. Letter to the Editor
    1. Localized demodicosis due to Demodex cati on the muzzle of two cats treated with inhalant glucocorticoids (pages 222–e58)

      Petra Bizikova

      Version of Record online: 10 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12123

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      Background- Feline demodicosis due to Demodex cati is a rare skin disease often associated with concurrent disease and generalized immunosuppression. Local immunosuppression due to the application of topical immunomodulatory drugs, such as glucocorticoids and tacrolimus, or by tumour cells has been suggested as a potential trigger for development of localized demodicosis in humans and animals. Objectives- The goal was to describe two cats with asthma that developed localized demodicosis on the muzzle as a result of chronic therapy with a glucocorticoid administered via dispensing inhaler mask. Conclusions and clinical importance- Demodicosis should be considered as a possible differential diagnosis in cats with primary alopecia or other skin lesions on the face exposed to inhalant glucocorticoids. Minimization of contact between the inhalant glucocorticoid and the skin can be achieved by wiping residual powder from the face and by keeping the mask tightly pressed to the skin to avoid contact with the surrounding area.

    2. Topiramate in the management of feline idiopathic ulcerative dermatitis in a two-year-old cat (pages 226–e60)

      David Grant and Clare Rusbridge

      Version of Record online: 18 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12124

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      Background- Feline idiopathic ulcerative dermatosis is a rare, poorly understood condition characterized by self-trauma. The lesion presents as a nonhealing, crusted ulcer, which occurs most commonly on the dorsal midline of the neck or between the scapulae. Conclusions and clinical importance- Remission was obtained within 4 weeks and has been maintained over a 30 month period with topiramate (5 mg/kg orally twice daily), an anti-epileptic drug used in human medicine. Attempts to withdraw this therapy led to relapse within 24 hours on two occasions. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first case report of the use of this drug for feline idiopathic ulcerative dermatosis.

    3. Dermatomyositis-like disease in a Rottweiler (pages 229–e62)

      Francesca Bresciani, Laura Zagnoli, Federico Fracassi, Ezio Bianchi, Carlo Cantile, Francesca Abramo and Marco Pietra

      Version of Record online: 5 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1111/vde.12128

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      Background – Canine dermatomyositis is a hereditary disease described in collies and Shetland sheep dogs and their cross-breeds. A similar disease, called dermatomyositis-like disease, has been described occasionally in other breeds but never in the Rottweiler. Hypothesis/Objectives – We report on the clinicopathological findings associated with dermatomyositis-like disease in a Rottweiler. Conclusions and clinical importance – This is the first report of dermatomyositis-like disease in a Rottweiler.

  5. Letter to the Editor

    1. Top of page
    2. Abstracts
    3. Review
    4. Scientific Papers
    5. Case Reports
    6. Letter to the Editor

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