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Alterations in the hemostatic profiles of dogs with naturally occurring septic peritonitis

Authors

  • Adrienne M. Bentley DVM, DACVS,

    1. Department of Clinical Studies, Matthew J. Ryan Veterinary Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
    Current affiliation:
    1. Veterinary Medical and Surgical Group, Ventura, CA
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  • Philipp D. Mayhew BVMS, DACVS,

    1. Department of Clinical Studies, Matthew J. Ryan Veterinary Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, University of California, Davis, CA
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  • William T. N. Culp VMD, DACVS,

    1. Department of Clinical Studies, Matthew J. Ryan Veterinary Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, University of California, Davis, CA
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  • Cynthia M. Otto DVM, PhD, DACVECC

    Corresponding author
    • Department of Clinical Studies, Matthew J. Ryan Veterinary Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
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  • Financial support provided by The Barry and Savannah French-Poodle Memorial Fund and the Department of Clinical Studies, Matthew J. Ryan Veterinary Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.

  • The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

  • Presented in part at the 2007 American College of Veterinary Surgeons Veterinary Symposium, Chicago, Illinois, October 17–21, 2007.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to

Dr. Cynthia Otto, Matthew J. Ryan Veterinary Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3900 Delancey St, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.

Email: cmotto@vet.upenn.edu

Abstract

Objective

To characterize derangements in the hemostatic profiles of dogs with naturally occurring septic peritonitis and determine if such derangements were predictive of survival.

Design

Prospective, observational single cohort study.

Setting

University veterinary teaching hospital.

Animals

A total of 27 client-owned dogs with naturally occurring septic peritonitis.

Interventions

Standard treatment included fluid resuscitation, antimicrobial therapy, supportive care, and surgery provided at the discretion of the primary clinician. Blood was collected preoperatively and on days 1 and 3 postoperatively for platelet count, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, D-dimer and fibrinogen concentrations, total protein C (PC) and antithrombin (AT) activities, and thromboelastography.

Measurements and Main Results

Sixteen of 27 (59%) dogs survived. Preoperative PC deficiency was identified in 10 of 11 (91%) nonsurvivors and 2 of 15 (13%) survivors. Preoperative AT deficiency was identified in 10 of 11 (91%) nonsurvivors and 14 of 15 (93%) survivors. Compared to survivors, nonsurvivors had lower mean preoperative PC (98 ± 24% versus 49 ± 26%; P < 0.001) and AT (53 ± 9% versus 32 ± 16%; P < 0.001) activities. Anticoagulant activities decreased on day 1 postoperatively. As a predictor of survival, preoperative PC activity of more than 60% achieved a sensitivity of 93% and specificity of 82%. Preoperative AT activity of more than 41.5% achieved a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 82%. The maximum amplitude, α angle, and coagulation index from preoperative thromboelastograms of survivors were significantly greater (more hypercoagulable) than nonsurvivors (P < 0.01), with the maximum amplitude being the most specific predictor of survival (100%).

Conclusions

Deficiencies of PC and AT and hypercoagulability appear to be consistent features of naturally occurring canine sepsis and may be useful prognostic indicators in canine septic peritonitis.

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