Comparison of a gel column blood typing method and a point-of-care cartridge for Dog Erythrocyte Antigen 1.1

Authors

  • Shauna L. Blois DVM, DVSc, DACVIM,

    Corresponding author
    • Department of Clinical Studies, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada
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  • Danielle M. Richardson DVM, DACVIM,

    1. Department of Clinical Studies, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada
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  • Anthony C. G. Abrams-Ogg DVM, DVSc, DACVIM

    1. Department of Clinical Studies, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada
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  • Financial support for this study provided by the Ontario Veterinary College Pet Trust Fund.

  • The authors declare no conflict of interests.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to

Dr. Shauna L. Blois, Department of Clinical Studies, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada, N1G 2W1.

Email: sblois@uoguelph.ca

Abstract

Background

Blood typing for the presence of Dog Erythrocyte Antigen (DEA) 1.1 is recommended in all donor and recipient dogs prior to transfusion of blood products. The objective of this study was to determine if a point-of-care DEA 1.1 blood typing cartridge could be used in place of the gel column typing method.

Study Design

Detection of DEA 1.1 was performed using a laboratory-based gel column method and a point-of-care cartridge. A convenience sample of 30 healthy blood donors, 13 dogs with immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) (3 of which had concurrent immune-mediated thrombocytopenia [IMT]), and 44 dogs with other diseases was included in the study.

Key Findings

Agreement was observed between the tests for normal dogs and dogs with nonimmune-mediated disease in 74/74 cases. Two dogs in the IMHA group had indeterminate gel column blood typing results; 1 dog in this group had a negative gel column test result but a positive cartridge test result.

Significance

There was good agreement between the 2 methods for normal dogs and dogs with nonimmune-mediated disease. Blood typing methods in dogs with IMHA should be further investigated.

Ancillary