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Presumptive immune-mediated thrombocytopenia secondary to massive Africanized bee envenomation in a dog

Authors

  • Reid K. Nakamura DVM, DACVECC,

    1. Advanced Veterinary Care Center, Lawndale, CA 90260
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    • Drs. Nakamura and Bianco are presently affiliated with Advanced Critical Care, Emergency and Specialty Services, 20051 Ventura Blvd, Ste I, Woodland Hills, CA 91364.

  • Renee K. Fenty DVM, DACVECC,

    1. Internal Medicine Department, Veterinary Specialists of the Valley, CA 91364
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  • Domenico Bianco DVM, PhD, DACVIM

    Corresponding author
    1. Internal Medicine Department, Veterinary Specialists of the Valley, CA 91364
    • Address correspondence and reprint requests to Dr. Domenico Bianco, Advanced Critical Care, Emergency and Specialty Services, 20051 Ventura Blvd, Ste I, Woodland Hills, CA 91364. Email: domebia@iol.it

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    • Drs. Nakamura and Bianco are presently affiliated with Advanced Critical Care, Emergency and Specialty Services, 20051 Ventura Blvd, Ste I, Woodland Hills, CA 91364.


  • The authors declare no conflict of interests.

Abstract

Objective

To describe a case of immune-mediated thrombocytopenia (IMT) after massive Africanized bee envenomation in a dog.

Case Summary

While boarding at a kennel, a dog was stung by approximately 300 Africanized bees. During initial veterinary examination, the dog was deemed to be in shock, characterized by collapse, with hypotension, bradycardia, and hypoglycemia. In addition, severe diffuse erythema and edema were noted over the entire body. Supportive care, including IV crystalloid and colloid fluids, dextrose, fresh frozen plasma, oxygen therapy, broad spectrum antimicrobials, dexamethasone, and diphenhydramine was initiated. The dog's condition stabilized over the next 2 days. Forty-eight hours after admission the dog developed hematemesis and hematochezia, and severe thrombocytopenia was identified. Extensive diagnostic investigation revealed no likely trigger other than the Africianized bee exposure, and a diagnosis of IMT was made. Following a red blood cell transfusion and immunosuppressive doses of dexamethasone and gastroprotectant therapy, the dog's condition stabilized, and the platelet count returned to normal after 7 days from initiation of therapy.

New or Unique Information Provided

IMT is a possible sequelae of massive Africanized bee envenomation in the dog.

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