Diagnostic accuracy of the SNAP and Spec canine pancreatic lipase tests for pancreatitis in dogs presenting with clinical signs of acute abdominal disease

Authors

  • Mark D. Haworth BVSc,

    1. School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, Murdoch University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
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  • Giselle Hosgood BVSc, MS, PhD, DACVS,

    1. School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, Murdoch University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
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  • Katrin L. Swindells BVSc, DACVECC,

    1. School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, Murdoch University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
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  • Caroline S. Mansfield BSc, BVMS, PhD, DECVIM

    Corresponding author
    1. Faculty of Veterinary Science, The University of Melbourne, Werribee, Victoria, Australia
    • Address correspondence and reprint requests to Dr. C. Mansfield, Faculty of Veterinary Science, The University of Melbourne, 250 Princes Highway, Werribee, Victoria 3013, Australia. Email: cmans@unimelb.edu.au

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  • The study was performed at Murdoch University.

  • The authors declare no conflict of interests.

  • Presented as an abstract at the Australian College of Veterinary Scientists College Science Week, Gold Coast Australia, July 2011.

Abstract

Objectives

To (i) assess the clinical diagnostic accuracy of SNAP canine pancreatic lipase (cPL) and specific canine pancreatic lipase (Spec cPL) and (ii) assess the agreement of an abnormal test result between SNAP cPL and Spec cPL in dogs presenting with acute abdominal disease.

Design

Prospective observational cohort study.

Setting

University teaching hospital emergency center.

Animals

Thirty-eight client-owned dogs that presented with acute abdominal disease, with a known final diagnosis between March 2009 and April 2010. Dogs were retrospectively assigned into 2 groups, dogs with acute pancreatitis (AP) (Group 1) and dogs without AP (Group 2).

Interventions

Paired serum samples obtained within 24 hours of presentation were analyzed using the SNAP cPL test and Spec cPL assay.

Measurements and Results

SNAP cPL clinical sensitivity and specificity was 82% (9/11 dogs of group 1) and 59% (16/27 dogs of group 2), respectively. Spec cPL clinical sensitivity and specificity was 70% (7/10 dogs of group 1) and 77% (20/26 dogs of group 2), respectively. Accuracy of the SNAP and Spec cPL for a clinical diagnosis of pancreatitis was found to be 66% and 75%, respectively. Agreement between a positive SNAP (cPL ≥ 200 μg/L) and a clinical diagnosis pancreatitis resulted in κ = 0.33. Agreement between an increased Spec (cPL ≥ 400 μg/L) and a clinical diagnosis of pancreatitis resulted in a κ = 0.43. The agreement between SNAP and Spec cPL (cPL ≥ 200 μg/L) for the entire cohort resulted in κ = 0.78.

Conclusion

SNAP cPL and Spec cPL results may provide a "false positive" diagnosis of pancreatitis in up to 40% of dogs presenting with acute abdominal disease. There is good overall agreement between SNAP cPL and Spec cPL; however, there were 4/38 dogs with positive SNAP cPL and "normal" Spec cPL.

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