A novel technique for ventral orbital stabilization: the masseter muscle flap

Authors

  • Amilan Sivagurunathan,

    1. Section of Surgery, Department of Companion Animal Clinical Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Sonja C. Boy,

    1. Department of Oral Pathology and Oral Biology, School of Dentistry, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Gerhard Steenkamp

    Corresponding author
    1. Section of Surgery, Department of Companion Animal Clinical Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Loss of the caudal maxilla and ventral orbit after tumor resections can have negative functional and esthetic influences on the eye involved. This article reports on a case of a caudal maxillary acanthomatous ameloblastoma involving the ventral orbit that was resected and stabilized with a masseter muscle flap. The masseter muscle flap was generated from the superficial belly of the masseter muscle in order to close a defect in the orbital rim, created by a caudal maxillectomy. None of the published complications such as enophthalmos, excessive lacrimation, globe deviation, or strabismus were noted, 8 months following the procedure. The only clinical sign present at the time of re-evaluation was mild lacrimation. The authors propose the use of a masseter muscle flap as a viable technique in stabilizing the ventral orbit after caudal maxillectomy and ventral orbitectomy, preventing the complications associated with this surgery.

Ancillary