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Outcome of conjunctival flap repair for corneal defects with and without an acellular submucosa implant in 73 canine eyes

Authors

  • Daniel M. Dorbandt,

    1. Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA
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  • Phillip A. Moore,

    1. Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, AL, USA
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  • Kathern E. Myrna

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA
    • Address communications to:

      K. E. Myrna

      Tel.: 706 542-3221

      Fax: 706 542-6460

      e-mail: kmyrna@uga.edu

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Abstract

Objective

To report and compare the success rate of a conjunctival pedicle flap (CPF) alone vs. a CPF with an underlying acellular submucosa implant for the repair of deep or perforating corneal wounds in dogs.

Procedures

Records of 69 dogs (73 eyes) receiving a CPF with or without an acellular submucosa implant between 2004 and 2012 were reviewed. Successful outcome was defined as a comfortable eye with vision at the last post-operative evaluation. Age, breed, underlying corneal disease, surgical time, lesion characteristics, topical therapies, and postoperative complications were investigated.

Results

Groups consisted of dogs that had a CPF alone (n = 37) and dogs that had a CPF plus an acellular submucosa implant (n = 36). Age, lesion size, surgical time, and time to discontinuation of topical anti-proteolytic medications was not significant between groups. Topical antibiotic use was terminated 13 days sooner (P ≤ 0.01) in dogs with an acellular submucosa implant. The combined success rate of all corneal wounds was 93% with success rate of corneal perforations, descemetoceles, and deep stromal wounds being 89%, 95%, and 100%, respectively. There was no difference in overall success rate between groups. Increasing age was associated with a negative outcome (P ≤ 0.01). Lesion size, presence of a corneal perforation, and concurrent keratoconjunctivitis sicca was not associated with a negative outcome.

Conclusions

A comparable success rate is achieved for deep or perforating corneal wounds stabilized with a CPF alone vs. a CPF plus acellular submucosa. Glaucoma, persistent uveitis, and cataract formation were not reported as post-operative complications in this study population.

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